Then in 1946 Brooks received the Guggenheim Fellowship for the first time and

Then in 1946 brooks received the guggenheim

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Then, in 1946, Brooks received the Guggenheim Fellowship for the first time and was selected as one of the "Ten Young Women of the Year" in the magazine Mademoiselle.Brooks's second poetry book, Annie Allen (1949), focuses on the life and experiences ofa growing young black woman in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago. The 1950 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, making her the first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize, also helped her win Poetry's Eunice Tietjens.In addition to being a poet and writer, Gwendolyn Brooks was also a teacher.In the early 1960s, Brooks embarked on a teaching career as a creative writing instructor. She teaches at Columbia University in Chicago, Chicago State University, Northeastern University of Illinois, Columbia University and the University of Wisconsin. She continued to write and publish.
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In 1960, she published her third book, The Bean Eaters, which included her beloved "We Real Cool". She also published her long poem "In the Mecca" in 1968, nominated for the National Book Award in poetry. Family lifeBrooks married Henry Lowington Blakely Jr. in 1939. The couple had two children, Henry and Nora.Gwendolyn Brooks died of cancer on December 3, 2000, at age 83, at her home in Chicago, Illinois. She remained a resident of Chicago's South Side until her death. She was buried at the Lincoln Cemetery in Blue Island, Illinois.
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