1996 2001 the rise of taliban 1998 freedom house

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1996-2001- The rise of Taliban 1998 Freedom House Report o Two years after Taliban captured Kabul and imposed strict, centuries-old social code of isolated, mountain villages on more progressive urban areas, life in Afghanistan has returned to a pre-modern, Hobbesian form: nasty, short, and brutish. The Taliban’s violent, arbitrary rule has imposed order through terror. Its dehumanization of women, girls has turned educated women into beggars; left widows, mothers, and daughters to die of illnesses that have been treatable for decades; and denied a generation of firls access to basic education
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The Taliban captured the key northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif and several northern providences from the Uzbek warlord Rashid Dostan in Aug. 1998 and in Sept 1998, overtook central Bamian province, the Hazara Shiit stronghold Afghanistan under US Military Occupation 2001-2003 When and why did the Taliban become an enemy of the US? Why did the Taliban allow Osama Bin Laden (mujahadeen fighting against USSR) and Al-Qaeda to operate in Afghanistan, even after he was accused of masterminding the 1998 car bombs that destroyed US embassies in (Dar es Salaam, Tanzania), and (Nairobi, Kenya) and the 9/11/2011 terrorist attack in the USA? October 7, 2001: Operation Enduring Freedom End of 2001: Taliban lost Kabul and Kandahar, but kept pockets of resistance throughout the country. Warlords struggled in southern and eastern Afghanistan. December 2001: A broad-based, interim government led by Pashtun tribal leader Hamid Karzai , backed by the West and the UN, with very little authority outside Kabul. Karzai faced daunting tasks: Setting up working government institutions almost from scratch Maintaining power-sharing arrangement between rep. of ethnic Pashtuns and Tajiuks, Uszbeks and Until 2006, Freedom House is optimistic about Afghanistan, raising its status from Not Free to Partly Free, however ‘with environment of pervasive insecurity and violence throughout much of the country’ Marked increase in violence in 2006, rise in suicide attacks by the Taliban and other anit- government forces deterioration of government functions highlighted in 2009 when Freedom House lowered Afghanistan status from partly free to not free President Hamid Karzai secured a new term in 2009, but deeply flawed voting took place as insurgent and other violence continued to mount End of 2009, 50,000 UN troops, 10,000 US troops and Afghan army. However, Afghanistan largely remained in the hands of local military commanders, tribal leaders, warlords, drug traffickers and pretty bandits o Ring Road planned, ‘with roads come investment, investment comes hope’ Bush Jr. o Taliban blew up roads in response to US prescence 1. June 2011: President Obama announced that 10,000 troops would be withdrawn by the end of 2011 and an additional 23,000 troops would return by the summer of 2012 2. 2013: The Afghan army takes over all military and security operations from NATO forces 3. Taliban Resurgence after the withdrawal of US military (2013-present) 4.
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  • Spring '07
  • Wahlrab
  • Saddam Hussein

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