B W HEN C OURTS W ILL G IVE C HEVRON D EFERENCE TO A GENCY I NTERPRETATION The extent of this deference has been much debated If an agency\u2019s

B w hen c ourts w ill g ive c hevron d eference to a

  • Test Prep
  • iTaipeh
  • 20
  • 100% (10) 10 out of 10 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 12 - 14 out of 20 pages.

an agency official should consider in preparing an EIS, or in taking any other agency action. Such a payment is illegal and unethical. Even if the EIS was otherwise proper and the permit would have been issued on consideration of the environmental factors under a reasonable interpretation of the NFMA and the NEPA without the payment, the court would have invalidated the permit on the basis of the payment. V. Agency Enforcement and Adjudication A. I NVESTIGATION During the rulemaking process, an investigation obtains information about a certain individual, firm, or industry to avoid issuing a rule that is arbitrary and capricious and instead is based on a consideration of relevant factors.   After final rules are issued, agencies conduct investigations to monitor compliance. 1. Inspections An on-site inspection may be the only way to obtain evidence to prove a regulatory violation. Sometimes, an inspection or test is used in place of a formal hearing to correct or prevent an undesirable condition.  If a firm or individual refuses to cooperate with a request for an inspec- tion or for information, an agency may use a subpoena or a search warrant. 2. Subpoenas There are two basic types of subpoenas:  the subpoena  ad testificandum  (an ordinary subpoena, compelling a witness to appear at a hearing) and the subpoena   duces tecum   (compelling an individual or organization to hand over books, papers, records, or documents).  Agency demands are limited by— The purpose of an investigation (an improper purpose is harassment). The relevancy of the information being sought. The specificity of the demand for testimony or documents. The burden of the demand on the party from whom the information is sought. E NHANCING  Y OUR  L ECTURE W HAT   TO  D O  W HEN  OSHA I NSPECTS  Y OUR  C OMPANY The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 a  requires employers to furnish a workplace free of hazards likely to cause death or serious injury and to comply with safety and health regulations that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issues.  There are literally hundreds of OSHA standards covering all aspects of the workplace: ladders, stairs, exits, noise, safety devices, and so on. To determine whether an employer is complying with the standards, an OSHA inspector can enter a workplace at any reasonable time.   The employer may refuse to permit the inspector to enter, but a
Image of page 12
CHAPTER 43:   ADMINISTRATIVE LAW           91 refusal only postpones the inevitable—the inspector can obtain a search warrant and return. When an OSHA inspector arrives, he or she must show official credentials, including identification with a serial number and his or her photograph.  Normally, an inspector will explain the purpose of a visit and give the employer a copy of any employee complaints. K EEP  Y OUR  R ECORDS   AND  W ORKPLACE   IN  O RDER What the inspector looks at, where in the workplace he or she goes, and how long he or she is there is up to the inspector.   Typically, an inspector reviews an employer’s records of deaths, injuries, and illnesses—records that the employer is required to keep.  An inspector may tour the workplace, checking
Image of page 13
Image of page 14

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 20 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes