1269 a single water molecule can form four hydrogen

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12.69 A single water molecule can form four hydrogen bonds. The two hydrogen atoms form a hydrogen bond each to oxygen atoms on neighboring water molecules. The two lone pairs on the oxygen atom form hydrogen bonds with hydrogen atoms on neighboring molecules. 12.70 The heat capacity of water is quite high, meaning that a large amount of heat is needed to change the temperature of a quantity of water by even a small amount. 12.71 Water has a high surface tension. The debris on the surface provides shelter and nutrients for fish, insects, etc. 12.72 Water exhibits strong capillary action, which allows it to be easily absorbed by the plant’s roots and transported to the leaves. 12.73 In ice, water molecules pack in a very specific, ordered way. When it melts, the molecular order is disrupted and the molecules pack more closely. This makes liquid water (at least below 4 q C) denser than ice and allows ice to float. 12.74 As the temperature of the ice increases, the water molecules move more vigorously about their fixed positions until at some temperature, the increasing kinetic energy of the water molecules at last overcomes the attractions (hydrogen bonding) between them, allowing the water molecules to move freely through the liquid. 12.75 An amorphous solid has little order on the molecular level and has no characteristic crystal shape on the macroscopic level. An example would be rubber. A crystalline solid has a great deal of order on the molecular level and forms regularly shaped forms bounded by flat faces on the macroscopic level. An example would be NaCl. 12.76 When the unit cell is repeated infinitely in all directions, the crystal lattice is formed. 12.77 The simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic unit cells contain one, two, and four atoms, respectively. Atoms in the body of a cell are in that cell only; atoms on faces are shared by two cells; atoms at corners are shared by eight cells. All of the cells have eight corner atoms; 8 atoms x 1/8 atom per cell = 1 atom. In addition, the body-centered cell has an atom in the center, for a total of two atoms. The face-centered cell has six atoms in the faces; 6 atoms x 1/2 atom per cell = 3 atoms, for a total of 4 in the cell (corner + face). 12.78 The unit cell is a simple cubic cell. According to the bottom row in Figure 12.27, two atomic radii (or one atomic diameter) equal the width of the cell. 12.79 The layers of a body-centered arrangement are not packed in the most efficient manner. The atoms are only in contact with four other atoms; in a face-centered cubic arrangement, they contact six other atoms. This leads to closer packing and more complete filling of the space in the face-centered arrangement. 12.80 Krypton is an atomic solid. In atomic solids, the only interparticle forces are (weak) dispersion forces. Copper is a metallic solid. In metallic solids, additional forces (metallic bonds) lead to different properties.

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