Aspirin can sometimes irritate your stomach but taking it with food or straight

Aspirin can sometimes irritate your stomach but

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Aspirin can sometimes irritate your stomach, but taking it with food or straight after you’ve eaten can help to prevent this. You should also make sure that you drink plenty of water so that you don’t become dehydrated. Aspirin is not suitable for everyone. If you have liver or kidney problems, asthma, a blood-clotting disorder or if you’ve ever had an ulcer in your stomach you may not be able to take it. It’s not usually prescribed when you’re pregnant and you won’t be able to take it if you’re allergic to other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen or naproxen. The most common side effects that aspirin causes are indigestion and bleeding. In a small number of people it can cause bleeding in the stomach. If you notice unusual bleeding, Stroke Association F11LP Published July 2015 Call our Stroke Helpline on 0303 3033 100 or visit stroke.org.uk 5
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such as coughing up blood or if there is blood when you go to the toilet, you should see your doctor immediately. Risk of bleeding Because blood-thinning medication affects the way your blood clots, all blood-thinning medicines increase your risk of bleeding. So if you cut or injure yourself, it may take slightly longer than usual for the bleeding to stop. This shouldn’t cause too many problems for small cuts and injuries. However, if you are concerned by your bleeding, you should contact your doctor straight away. Other, less common side effects include wheezing or breathing difficulties, nausea, rashes and dizziness. Some people develop ulcers when they take aspirin for a long time because it damages the lining of your stomach. Your stomach is lined with special mucus that protects it from the acid it produces to digest food. If the lining is damaged, your stomach acid can start to erode the tissue underneath and cause an ulcer. If you have a burning or gnawing pain in your stomach this could be a sign that you have an ulcer and you should go to see your doctor. Stroke Association F11LP Published July 2015 Call our Stroke Helpline on 0303 3033 100 or visit stroke.org.uk 6
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Allergic reactions If you are feeling breathless, have a runny nose, severe rash, itching or swelling in your throat, mouth or face, these could be signs that you are allergic to some of the medicines you are taking. If you notice any of these signs you should contact your doctor immediately. Clopidogrel Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet drug. Usually, if you are prescribed clopidogrel after a stroke or TIA, the dose is 75mg a day. It can be taken with or without food, and you should take it at the same time each day. Clopidogrel is not suitable for everyone. It is not recommended if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. You also need to tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney problems, a bleeding disorder, or if you are taking other medicines. Clopidogrel interacts with other medicines such as aspirin, warfarin and proton pump inhibitors.
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  • Summer '07
  • HARRIS-WARRICK,R.M.
  • The Stroke Association, Stroke Association F11LP, Association F11LP Published

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