2016 Revised Alabama Course of Study Mathematics.pdf

3 students recognize volume as an attribute of three

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(3) Students recognize volume as an attribute of three-dimensional space. They understand that volume can be measured by finding the total number of same-size units of volume required to fill the space without gaps or overlaps. They understand that a 1-unit by 1-unit by 1-unit cube is the standard unit for measuring volume. Students select appropriate units, strategies, and tools for solving problems that involve estimating and measuring volume. They decompose three- dimensional shapes and find volumes of right rectangular prisms by viewing them as decomposed into layers of arrays of cubes. They measure necessary attributes of shapes in order to determine volumes to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
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5 th 2016 Revised Alabama Course of Study: Mathematics 41 Students will: Operations and Algebraic Thinking Write and interpret numerical expressions. 1. Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols. [5-OA1] 2. Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. [5-OA2] Examples: Express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18,932 + 921) is three times as large as 18,932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product. Analyze patterns and relationships. 3. Generate two numerical patterns using two given rules. Identify apparent relationships between corresponding terms. Form ordered pairs consisting of corresponding terms from the two patterns, and graph the ordered pairs on a coordinate plane. [5-OA3] Example: Given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 0, and given the rule “Add 6” and the starting number 0, generate terms in the resulting sequences, and observe that the terms in one sequence are twice the corresponding terms in the other sequence. Explain informally why this is so. Number and Operations in Base Ten Understand the place value system. 4. Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and 1 10 of what it represents in the place to its left. [5-NBT1] 5. Explain patterns in the number of zeros of the product when multiplying a number by powers of 10, and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10. [5-NBT2] 6. Read, write, and compare decimals to thousandths. [5-NBT3] a. Read and write decimals to thousandths using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form, e.g., 347.392 = 3 × 100 + 4 × 10 + 7 × 1 + 3 × ( 1 10 ) + 9 × ( 1 100 ) + 2 × ( 1 1000 ). [5-NBT3a] b. Compare two decimals to thousandths based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons. [5-NBT3b] 7. Use place value understanding to round decimals to any place. [5-NBT4]
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5 th 2016 Revised Alabama Course of Study: Mathematics 42 Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths.
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