On voting day the electorate split on largely sectional lines a Jacksons

On voting day the electorate split on largely

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On voting day the electorate split on largely sectional lines a. Jackson’s strongest support came from the West and South; the middle states and the Old Northwest were divided, while Adams won the backing of his own New England and the propertied “better elements” of the Northeast part of the United States b. Buy when the popular vote was converted to electoral votes, General Jackson’s triumph could not be denied as Adams was beaten by the electoral count of 178 to 83 c. Although a considerable part of Jackson’s support was lined up particularly in New York and Pennsylvania, the political center of gravity clearly had shifted away from the conservative eastern seaboard toward emerging states across the mountain D. “Old Hickory” as President 1. Old Hickory’s irritability and emaciated condition resulted in tuberculosis, and lead poisoning from two bullets that he carried in his body from near-fatal duels 2. Jackson’s upbringing had its shortcomings as he grew up without parental restraints 3. The youthful Carolinian shrewdly moved “up West” to Tennessee, where fighting was prized above writing; there, through native intelligence, force of personality, and powers of leadership, he became a judge and a member of Congress (profound passions) 4. The first president from the West, the first nominated at a formal part convention in 1832, and only the second without a college education (Washington), Jackson was unique a. His university was adversity & he had risen from the masses, but was not one of them b. Essentially a frontier aristocrat, he owned many slaves, cultivated broad acres, and lived in one of the finest mansions in America (the Hermitage near Nashville) c. More westerner than easterner, more country gentlemen than common clay, more courtly than crude, he was hard to fit into a neat category 5. Jackson’s inauguration seemed to symbolize the ascendancy of the masses; nobodies mingled with notables as the White House, for the first time, was open to the multitude 6. To conservatives this orgy seemed like the end of the world; “King Mob” reigned triumphant as Jacksonian vulgarity replaced Jeffersonian simplicity; faint-hearted traditionalists shuddered, drew their blinds, and recalled the French Revolution E. The Spoils System 1. Under Jackson the spoils system—that is, rewarding political supporters with public office—was introduced into the federal government on a large scale; Senator William Marcy’s remark: “To the victor belong the spoils of the enemy” 2. Jackson defended the spoils system on democratic grounds and the routine of office was though to be simple enough for any upstanding American to learn quickly, why encourage the development of an aristocratic, bureaucratic, office-holding class?
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