It is faith in fate and the desire to test it that

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It is faith in fate and the desire to test it that forces Pechorin to commit immoral acts that are not even interesting for him: having imagined himself an "ax in the hands of fate" he begins to pursue Mary with his barbs, and then falls in love with him, laughing at Grushnitsky, that eventually leads to a fateful duel for a young man; he advises Azamat - Bella’s brother-to kidnap his sister just for fun. There are moments in the novel, when our hero believes that the evil destiny completely wins him, Pechorin tries to blame himself for his bad deeds, and his fate, believing that it is responsible for all the troubles that have happened to him. All of Pechorin's experiences concerning the problem of fate are resolved in the last part of the novel, called "Fatalist", a person who believes in destiny. This part is still a mystery for literary critics, because it characterizes not so much Pechorin himself as a fatalist, but helps to understand the problems of life of a person that are meaningful to the author. It is in the novel "Fatalist" that the most important aspect of the author's understanding of the theme of fate is resolved: namely, God or the devil directs the destiny of man on earth. To solve this problem Lermontov chooses the hero Vulich, who is even more fatalist than Pechorin. Vulich decided to test his fate, putting on the most expensive - his life. He offered Pechorin a bet, according to which he shoots himself in the temple from a loaded pistol and looks at the fate of him to live or die (the fact is that the pistols of that time were misfired with a probability of one
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3 out of ten). Pechorin, looking into Vulich's eyes, tells him that he will die tonight. Vulich shoots himself in the temple, and the gun misfires. He goes to his house, and in the morning Pechorin learns that he was right: Vulich was killed the very same evening: a drunken Cossack killed him with a sword. According to the opinion of literary critics, Lermontov, in his characteristic author's manner, considers the problem of fate as a wicked joke of the devil over man. In the story "Fatalist" the devilish desire to experience fate comes to the head of the fatalist Vulich. In him, too, as if settling in a demon, made him conclude a fateful bet. And the same demon leads to the fact that Vulich dies the same night from the hands of a bitter drunkard and a ruffian. It would seem that the forces of evil triumph: they showed people an example of their power. However,
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  • Spring '08
  • Gomer,R
  • destiny, Pechorin, byronic hero, A Hero of Our Time, Mikhail Lermontov

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