An upper middle class school or affluent professional school focused on being

An upper middle class school or affluent professional

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took the skills that the working class schools focused on and expanded slightly on them. An upper middle class school or “affluent professional school” focused on being innovative, taught students how to question their work, and to strive to be their best. The high class school or “executive elite school” taught their students leadership skills and how to be disciplined. In this school it is believed that “schoolwork helps one to achieve, to excel, to prepare for life.” Anyon makes the argument that each school is only teaching the skills that each student needs to be kept in the same social class they are in now. For example, the lower class school was teaching basic “read and repeat” skills that many blue collar workers would utilize. The higher class school teaches leadership which CEO’s and many other high paying leadership positions would need (Anyon). While Anyon brings up good points in her article, it seems like she has not researched this issue enough to come to prove her conclusion correct. She only looked at five schools out of the entire country. Her research was not on a large enough scale to make her thesis relevant to society as a whole. There are millions of schools in the country and it has yet to be proven that every school tailors their curriculum because of students socioeconomic status. Schools give
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Underwood 3 students the ability to fulfil the American dream. This means that if a student works hard enough in school, they can change their life for the better. An example of this happening is Tim Blixseth. Tim Blixseth’s life is highlighted by Robert Frank in an article titled “Living It: Tim Blixseth”. Blixseth had grown up as a poor boy, living in a poor neighborhood, most likely going to a school that served students with low income families. Since he was born into a poorer family and perhaps attended a school with lower income families, some people would argue that his school would not have set him up to become successful. These people would be wrong. While Blixseth did have his disadvantages, education was not one of them. By the time he was 30 he was a millionaire. He was able to raise himself up in life because he was innovative and worked hard. His hard work ethic and always “looking for the next big problem to solve or industry to reinvent” led to his success (Frank). If schools had given Blixseth a bad education, he most likely would not have been able to become this successful.
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  • Winter '20
  • Ode, Laurel¬†Underwood

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