Use static resistant materials to handle computer

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Use static resistant materials to handle computer components. Never touch the metal connectors on a circuit board. Keep the computer repair location free of materials that accumulate electric charges (e.g., plastic or Styrofoam). Store sensitive components in static shielding bags (also called antistatic bags; they are usually tinted gray). Static resistant bags are not nearly as effective (usually tinted pink or blue). If a wrist strap is unavailable, keep your body in constant contact with the metal frame when working inside the computer. Unplug the system before working on internal components. Do not rely on the power cord for an electrical ground. Environmental Concerns 0:00-0:43 In this lesson, we'll talk about some environmental concerns that you need to be aware of when working on PC systems. As a PC technician, you'll come into contact with materials that need to be disposed of in a specific manner. Most communities have laws that dictate which kinds of substances and materials can be put in the common trash and which types of materials have to be disposed of in another way.Environmental laws vary around the nation so be sure to check your local laws that affect computer parts and cleaning solutions. Doing this will protect you and your organization from costly fines. With that in mind, let's talk about some general rules that you should abide by. Batteries 0:44-1:59 The proper disposal of batteries can be confusing. Disposal guidelines vary for different batteries. For example, in most states you can throw alkaline batteries in the regular trash, but in California, you can't. They are considered hazardous waste and should be disposed of with the household hazardous waste collection for special recycling. The disposal of laptop and notebook batteries are an environmental issue also. Most laptop batteries today are lithium ion batteries. However, some are nickel cadmium and nickel metal hydride batteries. The problem with these types of batteries is that they go bad relatively fast. They don't often last more than about a year or two. If you're servicing or supporting notebook systems, you'll find that you're replacing batteries for your users frequently. The question is what do you do with the old ones? In most communities, it's against the law to throw these batteries in the common trash because they're loaded with toxic chemicals. They need to be disposed of in the manner dictated by your local community. Contact your local environment management office to see if there's a recycling facility available. If there isn't, find out what they recommend you do with these old batteries, but don't dump these in the trash. Monitors 2:00-2:38 Another issue is old monitors, specifically cathode ray tube or CRT monitors. CRT monitors are loadedwith hazardous substances. In addition to hazardous substances, they also retain a large electrical charge.
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