Team relationships although the individual qualities

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Team Relationships Although the individual qualities of each team member form the basic building blocks of team success, how well the team works together is critical in determining overall team effectiveness. It has been suggested that the most significant barrier in building effective team relationships is the inability to give and receive feedback (cf. LaFasto, F., & Larson, C. (2001). When Teams work Best . Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage). To improve feedback
©SPU: Lecturers: Joyce Ndegwa (0721-808480 [email protected] ) and Onesphore Ngabo (0721-276927 [email protected] ) Page 17 ability and to strengthen existing interpersonal relationships, some scholars have recommended following the seven steps in what they call the Connect Mode l . The first letter of each of the steps form the acronym CONNECT . Step 1: Commit to the relationship . Let the other person know that you are interested in strengthening your relationship with him/her. Tell the other person why you believe it is worth having a conversation and reinforce your willingness to work to improve the relationship. Step 2: Optimize safety . After you commit to the relationship, help the other person feel safe by letting him/her know you will try your hardest not to make him/her feel defensive. This means you will commit to making every effort to understand and appreciate the other person’s point of view and try to suspend judgement. Step 3: Narrow to one issue . After creating a safe environment for discussion, the next step is to identify a single issue to be addressed. The issue might be the scheduling of breaks, statements that have been made in team meetings, the level of trust in the relationship, or your roles on an upcoming project. Step 4: Neutralize defensiveness . Before the conversation begins, think about the types of words, statements, or behaviours that might cause a defensive reaction in the other person. Avoid these provoking actions. While engaging in discussion, ask the other person to let you know if he/she is feeling defensive at any point. Use this feedback to work to diffuse defensive reactions. Step 5: Explain and echo . Explain what you observe, how it makes you feel, and the long-term consequences. For example, What I observe, Peter, is that you have a tendency to interrupt me in group meetings. In the budget meeting the other day, for instance, I had an idea that I tried to bring up a couple of times, and each time you interrupted me, and I had to wait. Eventually, the idea came out but, but maybe we could have gotten to it sooner if I had been given a chance. It makes me feel less valued, like my ideas don’t have a lot of merit. It makes me feel frustrated because I can’t seem to get my ideas on the table. And I am starting to feel resentful. The consequences are, if we don’t change this, I don’t think I am going to want to be in meetings with you in the future.
©SPU: Lecturers: Joyce Ndegwa (0721-808480 [email protected] ) and Onesphore Ngabo (0721-276927 [email protected] ) Page 18 After providing the explanation, ask the other person to echo (paraphrase)

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