What is the Prince and the Cobbler example and what does it demonstrate If the

What is the prince and the cobbler example and what

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6.What is the “Prince and the Cobbler” example and what does it demonstrate? 1.Why and how does Reid object to Locke? 2.How does Reid define the self and what is his theory of personal identity? 3.How is Reid’s account similar to Locke’s? 4.What is the “Officer and the General” example and what does it demonstrate? VI. Hume1.What are impressions and ideas? 2.How are simple impressions and simple ideas different from complex impressions and complex ideas? How are they related? 3.How does Hume define the ‘self’? How does this differ from Locke’s view? Reid’s view? 4.How are impressions and ideas related to Hume’s understanding of the self?
Free Will Free Will Thesis -An act is only free if the agent could have done otherwise Moral Responsibility- we can only punish people for being immoral if they have the choice to be moral Determinism The theory that every event is determined according to previous events and the laws of nature Past events + Laws of nature = current event P1. If determinism is true then every human action is casually necessitated P2. Then no one can act otherwise P3. One only has free will if you can act otherwise P4. Determinism is true C. No one has free will D’Holbach Man the “machine”- subject to the laws of motion We act according the pleasure/pain principle We act according to self-preservation We choose our strongest desire Incompatibilism (freedom and determinism) P1. Free will is incompatible with determinism P2. Humans do possess free will C. So, determinism is false We are moral We believe we have power to make choices We have the power over our actions Hume Our actions aren’t random but are b/c of our characteristics Actions can be predicted b/c of this Could choose differently had we different desires, values and beliefs Problem of free will is just how we define freedom Frankfurt Hierarchy of desires and willings First-order desire – directed on an object Second- order desire – desire directed on a desire (ex: desire not to desire) Second-order volition- a second order desire which we act on (this is the only form of free will)

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