Terrestrial ecosystems the terrestrial ecosystems of

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Terrestrial Ecosystems The terrestrial ecosystems of the Florida Everglades consists of five main terrestrial ecotypes, which are hardwood hammocks, pinelands, bayheads, sawgrass prairies, and the mangrove and cypress swamp forests. The hammocks are low tree islands, which consists of hardwood species both tropical and mild. The mangrove forests contain a variety of different species of mangroves, which their size is exceeded in only a few portions of the world. The sawgrass marshes of the Everglades are considered one of the largest in the world (Clough & Hogan, 2012). Endangered Species The Everglades provide protection for 800 different varieties of land and water animals, including 14 threatened species, 25 mammals, 400 bird species, 60 known reptile, amphibian, and insect species, as well as two threatened swallowtail butterfly species. The Everglades has been known for its variety of wading birds, such as Roseate Spoonbills, Egrets, Herons, and Wood Storks, along with a large number of smaller migratory birds. Some of these migratory birds are found on the endangered species list, such as Snail Kite, Wood Stork, and the Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow. The Everglades is also home to the American Alligator and the American Crocodile, which many people, mistake them for each other. The American Alligators prefer the deeper freshwater waterways called sloughs and wet prairie, where they hollow out pools for nesting. The American Crocodile inhabits the coastal mangroves and the Florida Bay. Besides the large variety of birds and reptiles which call the Everglades their home, there is also a variety of mammals inhabiting the Everglades. The Everglades is home to the highly endangered animal known as the Florida Panther, of which there are about 80 left of this species. Other mammals
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