Color each of the 5 regions of the vertebral column a different color cervical

Color each of the 5 regions of the vertebral column a

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Color each of the 5 regions of the vertebral column a different color: cervical, coccyx, lumbar, thoracic, sacrum. Label the four curvatures: cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral curvature. Check your answers by searching in Primal Pictures : PRE-LAB EXERCISE 4.4: Types of Vertebrae 51 © 2011 Shirley J. Wright, Ph.D. © Primal Pictures 2008
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Five different types of vertebrae comprise the vertebral column. Each is named for the region in which it is located. Each type of vertebra has distinguishing features that permit its identification even when it is on its own, separated from the vertebral column. Search in Primal Pictures: ; ; Label the type of vertebra shown below: cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacrum, coccyx. Note that in adults there is one sacrum which is composed of usually five sacral vertebrae. There is one coccyx which is composed of usually four fused coccygeal vertebrae. Thus, when asked the typical number of each type of vertebra in adult humans, there are 7 cervical, 12 thoracic and 5 lumbar vertebrae, and one sacrum and one coccyx . How did you do in Pre-Lab Exercise 4.2? 52 © 2011 Shirley J. Wright, Ph.D.
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PRE-LAB EXERCISE 4.5: Components of Vertebrae Each vertebra has similar components. The size and shape of the components differ between regions of the vertebral column. The parts common to most vertebrae are: 1. Vertebral body: one; most anterior region; cylindrical; weight bearing; all but first cervical vertebra (C1) has one; intervertebral discs rest on them. 2. Vertebral arch: one; posterior to vertebral body; has two major parts – each part has a right and left version. The atlas (C1) is unusual in that it has two vertebral arches. a. Pedicles: two (right and left); short, cylindrical processes that are each attached to the vertebral body. b. Laminae: two (right and left); broad plates that unite in the midline to form the roof of the arch; each is attached to a pedicle. 3. Vertebral foramen: space bounded by vertebral body, pedicles and laminae; houses spinal cord, meninges, vasculature, fat, and roots of spinal nerves; when vertebrae are stacked, their vertebral foramina form the vertebral canal . 4. Vertebral processes: several projections arising from vertebral arch. a. Spinous process: one median process that projects posteriorly and usually inferiorly. b. Transverse processes: two; located at junction of pedicle and lamina; projects posterolaterally. c. Articular processes: four (two superior, two inferior); located at junction of pedicle and lamina; have facets for articulation with other vertebrae. 5. Vertebral notches: two; located superior and inferior to each pedicle. Easiest to see in lateral view of vertebra. When combined with vertebra above or below, form intervertebral foramina which house spinal ganglia (dorsal root ganglia).
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  • Spring '11
  • Masthay
  • Vertebra, Bones of the torso

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