consequences of hasty imperial retreatstill lay in the future and the

Consequences of hasty imperial retreatstill lay in

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consequences of hasty imperial retreat—still lay in the future, and the Mountbattens probably felt they had earned their evening’s entertainment. © 2016 SMART Training Resources Pvt. Ltd.
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While the Mountbattens were sitting down to their Bob Hope movie, India’s constituent assembly was convening in New Delhi. The moment demanded grandiloquence, and Jawaharlal Nehru, Gandhi’s closest disciple and soon to be India’s first Prime Minister, provided it. “Long years ago, we made a tryst with destiny,” he said. “At the stroke of the midnight hour, while the world sleeps, India will awaken to life and freedom. A moment comes, which comes but rarely in history, when we step out from the old to the new, when an age ends, and when the soul of a nation, long suppressed, finds utterance.” Posterity has enshrined this speech, as Nehru clearly intended. But today his quaint phrase “tryst with destiny” resonates ominously, so enduring have been the political and psychological scars of partition. The souls of the two new nation-states immediately found utterance in brutal enmity. © 2016 SMART Training Resources Pvt. Ltd.
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In Punjab, armed vigilante groups, organized along religious lines and incited by local politicians, murdered countless people, abducting and raping thousands of women. Soon, India and Pakistan were fighting a war—the first of three—over the disputed territory of Kashmir. Gandhi, reduced to despair by the seemingly endless cycle of retaliatory mass murders and displacement, was shot dead in January, 1948, by a Hindu extremist who believed that the father of the Indian nation was too soft on Muslims. Jinnah, racked with tuberculosis and overwork, died a few months later, his dream of a secular Pakistan apparently buried with him. © 2016 SMART Training Resources Pvt. Ltd.
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176. In the view of the author what does the phrase "tryst with destiny" symbolise today? (a) A celebration of Indian independence (b) An inspirational quote (c) A reminder of Gandhi's assassination (d) A symbol of ills of partition 177. What does the author imply about the future of Pakistan? (a) It becomes a secular country (b) It becomes unsecular (c) It is unprosperous (d) It becomes a rogue state © 2016 SMART Training Resources Pvt. Ltd.
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178. The author persists on taking about the "Bob Hope movie" in article. Why? (a) Because the movie was Classic on 1947 (b) He thinks it caused the partition of sub-continent (c) He uses it to show the apathy of the Britishers to sub-continent (d) It was Mountbatten's favourite movie 179. Why was Gandhi assassinated? (a) Because he was favouring Muslims (b) His assassin thought he was partial to Muslims (c) He got killed in the violence after partition (d) None of these © 2016 SMART Training Resources Pvt. Ltd.
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Read the following passage and answer the questions given below.
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