WR150 Portfolio

Other than that you are right when you say that

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Unformatted text preview: Other than that you are right when you say that neither critic talk about why Elizabeth has no effect on George and your claim about Elizabeth being immature as well greatly explains this. 4) Overall, does the paper convince you of its argument? Why or why not? a. Overall the paper does convince me of its argument. I understand the claim that is making and she does well to show her evidence for her claim. However it could use more examples and elaborations on certain points (as outlined above and on the paper itself) to further convince me of its argument and strengthen its argument. This would definitely fix this issue and ensure that other readers are convinced as well. 15 Jung Artifact 3 – Paper 1 Draft 1 Comments Linda Jung WR150 - A1 February 1, 2013 Paper 1 – Draft 1 In Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio, relationships are a subtle, yet key connection between all the stories. One of the most important relationships is between George and Elizabeth Willard. A general observation can be made about the bond that they have with each other. Sherwood Anderson makes it obvious that these two characters are incapable of having a normal, stable relationship. He describes their relationship in a way that suggests that it is very distant. Anderson exemplifies this when he shows the George and Elizabeth Willard sitting by her window, staring at the events outside. However, Anderson makes clear that there is no exchange of words between the two, just silence. Despite this seemingly awkward connection between the two characters, it is safe to ask if Elizabeth Willard ultimately has an effect on her son George. Two critics, Edwin Fussell and Anthony E. Szczsiul have opposing views on the answer to this question. Simply put, Fussell ultimately believes that Elizabeth does have an effect on George and Szczsiul says that she doesn't. While both critics provide solid evidence to support their individual ideas, their reasoning is flawed. They both assume that George Willard is mature by the end of the novel and they use this assumption to drive their arguments on the effect of Elizabeth on her son. Elizabeth Willard fails to have an effect on George, not because of their distant relationship, but because of the immaturity that both of these characters possess. The relationship that Elizabeth and George hold with each other is not like any other relationship in the novel. Most people would expect a mother-son relationship to be the most intimate, however this fails to hold true for these two characters. Instead of having lively, personal conversations, their t i m e spent is described as, “the son sat in the room w i t h his mother, the silence m a d e them both f e el awkward” ( A nderson 17). The lack of conversation creates an Comment [Jason1]: If they never speak to each other and they just sit by the window together, isn’t that a very stable relationship? 16 impersonal environment, one without emotion and thought. Yet, there still seems to be slight intimacy between the two as if Elizabeth was loving George from a distance. Somehow, in those intimacy between the two as if Elizabeth was loving George from a distance....
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Other than that you are right when you say that neither...

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