Graphic organizers allow students to see the structures in stories Graphic

Graphic organizers allow students to see the

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instructional strategy for comprehension is the use of graphic organizers. Graphic organizers allow students to see the structures in stories. Graphic organizers are visual representations of key story elements and the interrelationships among these parts; teach children how stories are constructed to improve their comprehension of stories (Reutzel & Cooter, 2016). I think these instructional tools and strategies will improve Wongel’s reading and writing instruction. Wongel’s difficulties do arise from her lack of ability to read and write; however, she lacks structure. She reads without a purpose, resulting in low levels of comprehension. Her writing lacks organization and structure. Using graphic organizers will help Wongel organize her thoughts on the text, as well as focus on essential story elements. The use of the graphic organizer will need to be modeled to ensure proper usage. Not only does she need to understand how to use graphic organizers, but the cognitive thought processes it entails to fill in each section correctly. Comprehension strategies and how they are implemented differ among students and teachers. Using research-based practices, teachers intentionally and strategically introduce metacognitive comprehension strategies to ensure they are correctly interacting and interpreting complex text. By purposefully creating opportunities for students to monitor their understanding, teachers are creating critical thinkers. Through the use of consistent and explicit comprehension instruction, students at all reading and writing levels can develop a high level of cognitive thinking.
12 Part 4: Selecting Text Analyzing and selecting text that fits the academic needs of students, as well as appeals to their interest, is a critical part of literacy instruction. As a teacher, I must consider all aspects of the text, including the content, features, and overall readability. For students in grades 4-6, when selecting text, it is essential for it to be complex, and promote critical thinking skills and opportunities. While it is necessary for the text to be complex, it should not frustrate students. When searching for text appropriate for Wongel, I first appealed to her interest in animals and books with female leaders to appeal to her interest, as well as to boost her self-confidence. The first text I selected was an informational text. Informational text are useful in building students’ vocabulary because new words in informational texts are repeated more frequently than those in narrative texts (Hiebert & Pearson, 2013). Animal Defenses is a level M nonfiction text. It has a Lexile level of 730, which is lower than the average 4th grader. I need to meet Wongel, where she academically. The book uses more rigorous vocabulary than she is accustomed to, with words like distracts, poison, predators, prey, and venom. Researcher Elfrieda Hiebert (2013) states that teachers should study qualitative dimensions of the text to determine which features create obstacles or opportunities for learning (p.460). Wongel is a fluent reader who struggles to read on grade level due to language barriers and lack of comprehension of text.

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