PBN simply defines the aircraft navigation capabilities and required

Pbn simply defines the aircraft navigation

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“PBN simply defines the aircraft navigation capabilities and required performance necessary to operate on a given air traffic route, instrument approach, or in a defined airspace.” Predefined performance requirements! The foundation concepts for PBN are Area Navigation (RNAV), and Required Navigation Performance (RNP).
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Ground School 2017 Created by Steve Reisser RNAV AND RNP RNAV provides flexibility. It can be used for station-based nav such as DME, or Coordinate-based systems such as GPS, or self-contained systems such as INS. It provides greater safety, more flexibility, shorter routes and reduced time enroute. REQUIRED PERFORMANCE NAVIGATION RPN = RNAV + Navigation System Performance Monitoring and Alerting RPN is RNAV with enhanced knowledge of how the aircraft navigation system is performing (RNAV on steroids). Onboard monitoring and alerting capability improves pilot’s situational awareness, and can also enable reduced obstacle clearance or closer route spacing without ATC surveillance. Like GPS RAIM (receiver autonomous integrity monitoring), RPN monitors itself and is a safety critical characteristic . With regard to airspace or a specific operation, the associated RPN states the performance navigation for the operation as a distance in NMs from the intended centerline of a procedure or route. To read more you may want to read the 2006 FAA publication titled “ Roadmap for Performance-Based Navigation .” The framework is GLOBAL and has the basis embodied in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) setting criteria for RNAV 1 Departure and Arrival Procedures, and RNAV 2 Q & T Routes. The U.S. implementation will also have RPN and RPN-AR Approach procedures (Special Aircraft and Aircrew Authorization Required).
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Ground School 2017 Created by Steve Reisser RNAV procedures can provide benefit in all phases of flight, including departure, en route, arrival, approach, and transitioning airspace. For example, Standard Terminal Arrivals (STARs) can: Increase predictability of operations Reduce controller/aircraft communications Reduce fuel burn with more continuous vertical descents Reduce miles flown in Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) airspace Reduce interaction between dependent flows in multiplex airspace
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Ground School 2017 Created by Steve Reisser Optimized Profile Descent (OPD) As a component of its Trajectory-Based Operations NextGen initiative, FAA has authorized development of arrival procedures with vertical profiles optimized to facilitate a continuous descent from the top of descent to touchdown. OPD is designed to reduce fuel consumption, emissions, and noise during descent by allowing pilots to set aircraft engines near idle throttle while they descend. Utilizing RNAV, DFW implemented initially diverging, fanned routes in September 2005.
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