One unicef usa supporter in particular silicon valley

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generating significant support and awareness among the American public. One UNICEF USA supporter in particular, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Narges Bani Asadi, set an inspiring example. A biotech entrepreneur and an executive at Roche, Narges launched a Facebook fundraiser and rallied 2,500 among her Facebook network to help Syrian children under siege. Narges got the idea for her campaign after reading about an offer from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to match funds for good causes in honor of Giving Tuesday. “Here’s something hopeful I can do,” Narges remembers thinking. She launched her effort with a simple and effective plea: “Start your Tuesday with a kind act,” her first post read. In its first ten hours, the campaign attracted 212 donors and more than $10,000. Over the following two weeks, Narges’s plea to “Help Syrian Children Under Siege” was shared repeatedly, her circle of influence growing exponentially. When the fundraiser ended on December 13, 2016, it had been shared more than 500 times, and almost 2,500 people had donated to help Syrian child refugees. Collectively, they had raised over $103,000, including matches from The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Google and Apple. “Our fundraiser showed the power of one and the power of communities and how we can all drive change,” Narges posted. Narges was especially pleased to see a large contingent of Iranian-Americans participate. Narges grew up in Iran and migrated to the U.S. 12 years ago. “The Iranian-American community is very strong in terms of … their ambition and desire to serve. I think it’s just one small example of a community that mobilized over something that matters,” she explained. Most donors to Narges’ Facebook fundraiser contributed $10, $20 or $100 — relatively small amounts that, pooled together, amounted to “some tangible money that could really make a difference,” Narges says. Every donation counted. In January 2017 alone, UNICEF helped more than 53,000 people in 89 hard-to-reach locations with critical aid. In Damascus and Aleppo, UNICEF reached more than 2 million people with clean, safe water. And UNICEF helped bring education to nearly 990,000 Syrian children. “One of my passions in life is to be involved in children’s causes, which is what UNICEF is all about,” Narges says. “I know I can trust UNICEF.”
31 In 2016, UNICEF responded to Other humanitarian disasters Health crises Natural disasters Socio-political crises humanitarian emergencies. 344 118 117 78
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15 UNICEF works in more than 100 countries to improve water, sanitation and hygiene. Last year, UNICEF helped supply nearly 14 million children and adults with safe water and more than 11 million with basic toilets. Particularly during emergencies, the safe water and sanitation UNICEF provides can prevent a deadly cycle of contamination, malnutrition and disease.

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