Born in 1777 to a family of former indentured

Info icon This preview shows pages 5–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Born in 1777 to a family of former indentured servants, Roger Taney grew up among a prosperous group of tobacco farmers (Dickinson). Privately educated, Taney almost immediately felt a pull towards politics. First serving as a representative in a Federalist state, he became a Maryland state senator in 1816. Just a few years after, he became the Attorney General for Maryland in 1827. Moving outside of state politics,
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4 Taney entered the federal arena in the 1830s, serving in many roles, including Attorney General, acting Secretary of War, and as a controversial Secretary of the Treasury. 1 As acting Secretary of the Treasury, Taney experienced his first failed senatorial confirmation. As a reward for faithful service, President Jackson then nominated Taney for a Supreme Court justiceship in 1834; nevertheless, the Senate still felt hostile towards Taney and rejected the nomination. Jackson did not relent, however, and nominated Taney again in 1835 following the death of Chief Justice John Marshall. This time, the Senate confirmed him, and Taney took the oath of office in March of 1836 (Dickinson). Because he had succeeded John Marshall, Taney had a large bill to fill. Chief Justice Marshall had worked tirelessly to make the Court a respected and powerful institution. Taney had to sustain carefully, and continue to grow, the Court‘s stature. Although the Senate confirmed him, Taney‘s nomination was not universally accepted. A journal published in New Y ork printed: ―‗the pure ermine of the Supreme Court is sullied by the appointment of that political hack, Roger B. Taney‘‖ (Supreme Court Hist. Soc.). Slowly, Taney began to establish himself on the Court. His opinions and jurisprudence were different f rom those of Marshall‘s, although that distinction soon became less of a cause of debate. 1 The Bank of the United States wanted to renew its charter with Congress. At the time, William J. Duane was Secretary of the Treasury. President Jackson wanted to abolish the Bank and had Taney draft a statement, which essentially vetoed the Bank‘s renewal. This statement was later read to the cabinet and explained Jackson‘s reasons for rejecting the Bank. After his reelection, Jackson ordered Duane to withdraw the government deposited funds from the Bank and redeposit them into various state banks. When Duane refused, Jackson fired him and gave a recess appointment to Taney. Taney served in this position for about nine months, until the Se nate rejected his nomination (―Roger‖).
Image of page 6
5 As the Chief Justice gained footing on the Court, a case that would change his legacy began its slow ascension and would eventually land on the docket before him. Dred Scott was a slave owned by an Army surgeon. During the Mexican-American War (1846), the surgeon, John Emerson, took Scott from his home in Missouri to the free state of Illinois; Emerson had also taken Scott to Fort Snelling. The Northwest Compromise banned slavery in both Illinois and Fort Snelling. After the War, Scott returned to Missouri with Emerson. Following Emerson‘s death, Scott sued Mrs. Emerson
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern