Tea act the tea act of 1773 was an act of the

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Tea Act The Tea Act of 1773 was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain. Its principal objective was to reduce the massive surplus of tea held by the financially troubled British East India Company in its London warehouses and to help the struggling company survive The reaction to the Tea Act that led to the Boston Tea Party united all parties in Britain against American extremists. British parliament was united in passing the Intolerable Acts also known as Coercive Acts as a retribution for the uprising and violence of the Boston Tea Party. The Boston Tea Party is perhaps the most famous event preceding the American Revolution Intolerable Acts The Intolerable Acts was the American Patriots' name for a series of punitive laws passed by the British Parliament in 1774 after the Boston Tea party. They were meant to punish the Massachusetts colonists for their defiance in throwing a large tea shipment into Boston harbor. The Intolerable Acts closed Boston's port, stopped town meetings, and allowed for British troops to move into colonists' homes and forced the colonists to support them (these were the main effects). All three generally damaged colonist life, and angered the colonists to the point of war Boston Tea Party The Boston Tea Party (initially referred to by John Adams as "the Destruction of the Tea in Boston") was a political protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, on December 16, 1773 The Boston Tea Party was an effect of the Tea Act, which was proposed by England to the colonies of America. It was an act that placed large taxes on the American colonists when purchasing tea. There were many other acts being passed at this time, for instance the Stamp Act, Townshend Act, and Sugar Act.

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