We see a repetitive pattern in society that has

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minority beaten and broken, like many of their ancestors were during slavery. We see a repetitivepattern in society that has lasted centuries that depicts the African American culture as negligible and insignificant, devaluing the history and heritage of their people, and yet throughout history we see the people continue to rise against the oppression, fighting to have their voices heard and valued. “You may shoot me with your words, You may cut me with your eyes, You may kill me with your hatefulness, But still, like air, I’ll rise.” (Angelou, 1978). The passages at the end of And I Still Riseis the most powerful aspect of this literary work by far. These lines push the meaning of the work even more and make the deeper connections to the narrator’s heritage and the constant oppression of white society against her people. “Out of the huts of history’s shame, Irise, Up from a past that’s rooted in pain, I rise, I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide, Welling andswelling I bear in the tide. Leaving behind nights of terror and fear, I rise” (Angelou, 1978). These final lines show a substantial sense of pride in who she is and where she has come from. She is proud of her heritage and unafraid to speak of the experience of her people. She is voicing the story of her people in a way that shows the experience of African Americans in our country and challenges a Eurocentric society to see what has been done to her people. She rises above the“shame” associated with being who she is and proudly fights for a better future for herself and for her people. The line “Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave, I am the dream and the hope of the slave” (Angelou, 1978), shows us that the voices and experiences of African Americans throughout history will not be ignored, as our narrator will push forward and embody the hopes and dreams of her ancestors as she pushes through life against the oppression that still exists to this day. Another perspective of And I Still Risecan be analyzed through the Formalism lens. Formalism focuses on story, plot, poetic language, and form. Formalism also looks for how a work defamiliarizes the reader. Defamiliarization is defined by Schmoop as “when a writer makes the familiar seemunfamiliar” (Schmoop.com). Formalism looks at several literary devicessuch as imagery, metaphors, and repetition. Maya Angelou repeats the phrase "I rise" throughout the work as a theme. It is because of its repetition that this phrase is what stays in the reader's mind as they absorb the work. She hammers in the reminder through this repetition that no matter what oppression and humiliation she comes up against, she will rise above it and continueforward. She uses several metaphors and similes within the piece such as "But still, like dust, I'll rise" (Angelou, 1978) a simile symbolizing how she rises like the dust in the air. An example of metaphor she uses is "You may kill me with your hatefulness" (Angelou, 1978) where she addresses her oppressors hatred of her and her kind and how their hatred of her may kill her but

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