Any reason increased compliance whether or not it

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any reason increased compliance, whether or not it made sense!
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promoting compliance Norm of reciprocity : treat others as they have treated you Relatively short-lived Individual differences in “reciprocation ideology” Some people like to keep others in their debt Some people are wary of feeling indebted
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promoting compliance Sequential request strategies : persuasive methods that depend upon statements & questions being carried out in a specific order Foot-in-the-door Low-balling Door-in-the-face That’s not all
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sequential request strategies Foot-in-the-door technique Small request followed by larger one Why is it effective? Self-perception theory Dissonance reduction Works best when: Small request is not too trivial Target wants to view self as consistent
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sequential request strategies Low-balling First, secure agreement. Then reveal hidden costs Why is it effective? Post-decision justification Desire to be consistent
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sequential request strategies Door-in-the-face Large request (rejected), then moderate one Why is it effective? Perceptual contrast: 2 nd request seems small Reciprocal concessions
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sequential request strategies That’s not all! Adding something to an original offer, creating some pressure to reciprocate Why is this effective? The add-on may seem like a gift from the store or salesperson Sounds like a better deal —we’re getting more than we expected
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emotion-based approaches Both positive and (some) negative moods can increase rates of compliance Positive moods Our mood colors how we interpret events Want to maintain positive moods, so agree more easily ( mood maintenance )
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emotion-based approaches
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emotion-based approaches Negative moods Negative state relief hypothesis: People may engage in certain actions, such as agreeing to a request, to relieve their negative feelings and feel better about themselves Guilt can increase compliance
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resisting compliance These techniques work well only if they are hidden from view Assertiveness: Be firm and stand your ground
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obedience
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continuum of social influence resisting influence yielding to influence conformity compliance obedience independence assertiveness defiance automatic influence social pressure & norms requests orders
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“I was just following orders.”
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obedience Obedience : a change in behavior in response to the direct commands of an authority figure A social norm that is universally valued Socialized to obey authority figures
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obedience study Questions grew out of WWII The banality of evil? To what extent do normal people obey authority figures who order them to commit immoral acts?
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