revised_tv_crime_article_jan_2016_002_.doc

Steenberg lindsay 2013 forensic science in

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Steenberg, Lindsay. 2013. Forensic Science in Contemporary American Popular Culture: Gender, Crime, and Science . New York. Routledge. Osgerby, Bill and Anna Gough-Yates eds. 2001. Action TV: Tough Guys, Smooth Operators and Foxy Chicks . London. Routledge. Tasker, Yvonne. 2012. “Television Crime Drama and Homeland Security: From Law & Order to ‘Terror TV’.” Cinema Journal. 51(4): 44-65. Tasker, Yvonne. 2010. “Action Television/Crime Television: Sensation and Attraction.” Flow. http://flowtv.org/2010/10/action-television-crime-television/ . Last accessed 1 st February 2016. Villarejo, Amy. 2010. “TV Queen: Lending an Ear to Charles Pierce.” Modern Drama. 53(3): 350-369. 15
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1 See Jason Mittell (2004: 153-160) on genre mixing, a term he prefers to hybridity given the latter’s connotations of fixed categories that are brought together rather than a fluid model of television genre. It is in part the very extent of crime television as a category, as I suggest later in this piece, that poses particular challenges for models of genre and the crime/action interface more particularly. 2 See for example Fishman and Cavender. eds. Entertaining Crime; Quinn “The Politics of Law and Order”. 3 See for example Liza M. Cuklanz and Sujata Moorti “Television’s “New” Feminism” who locate their discussion of Law and Order: Special Victims Unit as intervening in and yet framed by what they regard as “the traditionally masculine genre of detective fiction” (2006, 303). 4 See for example, Elayne Rapping Law and Justice as Seen on TV ; Susanna Lee “These are Our Stories.” 5 “Crime in a Post-CSI Mediascape,” Oxford Brookes University, September 2013. 6 Amongst others see Steven Cohan’s analysis of CSI ’s visual strategies in his (2008) monograph. An interest in visual style underpins the identification of ‘nordic noir’ in recent critical commentary. 7 For example the shifting rhetoric from that of a “war on drugs” to that of a “war on terror” impacts crime television significantly in the post-9/11 era. 8 Undoubtedly my approach is primarily textual since I wish to highlight textual qualities that have, in my view, been unhelpfully overlooked. This is not to argue against the importance of the cultural model that Mittell so influentially outlines. Indeed the management of sensational content via discourses of responsibility, realism and authenticity is a key institutional aspect of the history of crime television in the United States as Mittell’s analysis of Dragnet demonstrates (2004). 9 Georges Sadoul writes of Daring Daylight Burglary that “it presents at least ten scenes linked together by the presence of the thief or of his pursuers. Here we see how montage in natural settings brought about the birth of the ‘chase sequence,’ discovered by the English about 1900.” Sadoul remarks the shift from the comic chase to the dramatic although not the importance of crime. (1946, 255) 10 Butler is not dealing specifically with crime as a genre here, referring to “visually sophisticated programs such as Miami Vice , ER , and single-camera sitcoms” (2010, 14).
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