2 That provision of these rewards would have a positive effect on morale 3 That

2 that provision of these rewards would have a

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(2) That provision of these rewards would have a positive effect on morale. (3) That there is a positive correlation between morale and performance. 3.5 Factors Motivating Employees in Extension Organisation Herzberg’s study of motivation grouped the factors which motivate workers into two main categories: (a) Hygiene factors; and (b) Motivational factors.
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AEM736 EXTENSION ORGANISATION AND MANAGEMENT 93 3.5.1 Hygiene Factors Herzberg referred factors here as hygiene because they are environmental, and in the same way as public hygiene measures do not make people healthy, but prevent them from being unhealthy. Also, these factors do not make people happy as such or satisfied at work, but they prevent them from being unhappy and dissatisfied. The factors include the following: 1. Organisational policies and administration 2. Type of supervision 3. Working condition 4. Interpersonal relations 5. Status and security 6. Fringe benefits e.g. midday meals, awards, etc. 3.5.2 Motivational Factors These refer to those factors centered on the job or task to be performed and may provide real job satisfaction and the right motivation. Factors here are: (1) Opportunities for achievements (2) Recognition (3) Interest in the work These aforementioned set of factors are considered to have a part to play in motivating employees. It is argued that there are limitation s to the effect of the hygiene factors and that more effective and lasting motivation is obtained through the application and implementation of motivational factors. SELF ASSESSM ENT EXERCISE 2 List the 3 assumptions underlining motivation in an organisation.
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AEM736 EXTENSION ORGANISATION AND MANAGEMENT 94 3.6 Guidelines for Motivating Subordinates Manager or supervisors are to use these guides for motivation to be effective: 1. Try to identify and understand the needs and personal goals of your staff. Beware of your assumptions which may be false and misleading. 2. Remember that money is not the only motivator. There are man y other rewards that may be more effective than money in getting your staff to work harder e.g. recognition and in-service training. 3. Set your staff targets which are realistic and achievable, but also stretch their ability. If possible, involve subordinates in setting their own targets. 4. Always recognise achievement by praise or some other rewards. 5. Do not alter target without consulting with the staff concerned. If changes are necessary, they should be agreed j ointly. 6. Harness the strength of the group. Group pressures can affect motivation positively and negatively. Involving your staff as a group in making decisions will strengthen their commitment. 7. Keep your staff informed about what is going on in the organisation. 3.7 Ways of Improving Rewards and Incentives Rewards and incentives system can be improved in several ways such as: 1. Rewarding Superior Performance Extension personnel may be encouraged to form professional societies to develop and communicate high standards, as well as to recognise superior performance. A professional monthly journal or newsletter can
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