3 McVeigh chose the Alfred P Murrah Building because it was fairly isolated and

3 mcveigh chose the alfred p murrah building because

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McVeigh chose the Alfred P. Murrah Building because it was fairly isolated and he wanted to minimize death away from the Federal Building . “McVeigh participated in a series of bank robberies around the Midwest with a gang from Elohim City in an effort to raise money for projects involving anti-government violence.” 3 By the summer of 1994 McVeigh and Nichols began w orking at a lakeside campground near McVeigh's old Army post, to construct an explosive device mounted in the back of a rented Ryder truck. McVeigh and Nichols would travel from Kanas and Texas buying supplies to build the bomb. McVeigh would find time to visit Oklahoma City to inspect the building and calculate his own position at the time the bomb would be likely to explode. On April 16, 1995, McVeigh a newly purchased Mercury Marquis, while Terry Nichols followed behind in a pickup. McVeigh parked the old Marquis, which was to be his getaway car, in a lot near the Murrah Building and removed the license plate. April 19 stood out for historical meanings to McVeigh. It was the date in April 1995 the federal government launched its attack on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas. On April 19, 1995, McVeigh ignited one timed fuse, then another, got out of the Ryder truck, locked the door, and headed towards his getaway car. At 9:02 am a truck-bomb exploded outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Dozens of cars and more than 300 nearby buildings were damaged or destroyed in the blast. 168 people died, including 19 children, with several hundred people more injured. Many suspected that the attack was the work of Middle Eastern terrorists. The FBI, however, quickly arrived at the scene and began supporting rescue efforts and investigating the facts. Beneath the pile of concrete debris 3 "The Oklahoma City Bombing and the Trial of Timothy J. McVeigh: An Account." The Oklahoma City Bombing and the Trial of Timothy J. McVeigh: An Account. Accessed August 11, 2015. . 4
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and twisted steel and rubble were clues who or what was behind this attack. April 20, the rear axle of the Ryder truck was located, on which the vehicle identification number was still intact. It was traced to a body shop in Junction City, Kansas from where it was rented. Officer Charles Hanger, of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, noticed a Mercury Marquis driving northbound on I-35, twenty miles south of the Kansas border. The car had no license plate, so the officer pulled the driver over. Upon investigation, McVeigh turned out to be carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, in addition to driving without a license or a vehicle registration. He was arrested, booked, and placed in the county jail in Perry, Oklahoma. The body shop employees in Kanas helped the FBI put together a composite drawing of the man who had rented the van. As FBI agents showed the drawing around town, local hotel employees supplied a name, Timothy McVeigh. As the FBI scrambled to locate him, they were astonished to find that McVeigh was already in jail. As they interviewed McVeigh, they learned of his extremist ideologies and his anger over the events at Waco two years earlier. They also
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  • Summer '13
  • shollenberger
  • History, Waco Siege, Oklahoma City bombing, Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, Timothy McVeigh, Timothy J. McVeigh

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