Substance abuse can drain a familys financial and

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Substance abuse can drain a family's financial and emotional resources (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 1992
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CONCLUSION All girls and boys have the right to education. Education fosters dignity and a Sense of self-worth. It offers opportunities to acquire knowledge and skills and Enhances life prospects. Along with nutrition, health and skills, education is a Pillar of human capital: The essential elements together enable people to lead Productive lives and to contribute to their countries’ economic growth and Development. But poverty prevents millions of children, especially girls, from attending school. The high returns to investing in the education of girls are indisputable. Yet remarkably few detailed studies of these returns have sought to clarify public or private investment priorities. As a consequence, no explanation has been offered as to why the high returns to female education have not attracted more public and private investment, especially in those countries where girls receive much less education than boys do. Such an explanation must rest on analysis of why returns to schooling differ by gender. The reasons for this may be related in part to structure of aggregate demand for labor and in part to economic constraints such as income per capita and the costs of delivering school services (Schultz 1987). The differences in what a family is prepared to invest in a son’s and a daughter’s education may be perpetuated by regulations and intensives in public and private education system. They may also reflect family decision-making and the preferences of parents who value greater productivity less highly in a daughter than in a son or who are unable to appreciate fully the enhanced n on-market productivity of better educated girls understanding why this pattern of preferences occur more in some settings than in
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others and which policy interventions can change family behavior poses a challenge for researchers and program designers alike. The yields from investing in girls’ education are substantial. An educated girl is likely to increase her personal earning potential, as well as reduce poverty in her community. According to the World Bank, the return on one year of secondary education for a girl correlates with as high as a 25% increase in wages later in life. The effects carry from one generation to the next: educated girls have fewer, healthier and better educated children. For each additional year of a mother’s education, the average child attains an extra 0.32 years, and for girls the benefit is slightly larger. For this reason according to me investing in female is more profitable than investing in male since by educating female we educate the whole nation and this can be evidenced from the scope at which he covers from being educated i.e. ranging from individual and her family, the society she lives in and in the general nation, i.e. the economy. Than boy whose only focus is in his home and family.
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REFERENCES Abu-Ghaida D. and Klasen S. 2004. “The Economic and Human Development Costs of Missing
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