Green and gold frog litoria raniformis clemann

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Green and Gold Frog ( Litoria raniformis ) (Clemann & Gillespie 2007; Threatened Species Section 2007a), White-bellied Sea Eagle ( Haliaeetus leucogaster ) (Threatened Species Section 2006b), Orange-Bellied Parrot ( Neophema chrysogaster ) (OBPRT 2006), Southern Hairy Red Snail ( Austrochloritis victoriae ) (Threatened Species Section 2007b) and Australian Grayling ( Prototroctes maraena ) (Backhouse et al. 2008). The Plan complements these plans, outlining species-specific management actions for King Island. These actions have been prioritised for inclusion in the Plan. The Lavinia State Reserve Draft Management Plan (PWS 2004), details management objectives and prescriptions for natural and cultural values within the Reserve. PWS are currently reviewing the Management Plan; consultation undertaken in the development of the King Island Biodiversity Management Plan should ensure that actions identified in the two plans are complementary. The King Island Strategy Plan Report (Connell Wagner 2008), was commissioned by the King Island Council to address a wide range of planning and development issues that had been identified across the Island, including coastal development, township enhancement, agricultural and industrial land protection and development, and environmental issues in sensitive coastal and resource valued areas. A summary of current management documents, recovery plans, policies and strategies can be found in Appendix 1. 1.3 Legislative context Various Acts of Parliament that either protect native plants and animals directly and/or protect the habitats that support them and/or or integrate conservation objectives with other land management uses, are relevant to this Plan. The primary Acts that relate to the King Island Biodiversity Management Plan are described below. Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 The EPBC Act provides a legal framework to protect and manage nationally and internationally important flora, fauna, ecological communities and heritage places — defined in the Act as matters of national environmental significance. The eight matters of National Environmental Significance (NES) to which the EPBC Act applies are: world heritage sites; national heritage places; wetlands of international importance (known as ‘Ramsar’ wetlands after the international treaty under which such wetlands are listed); nationally threatened species and ecological communities; migratory species; Commonwealth marine areas; King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 6
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Great Barrier Reef Marine Park; and nuclear actions. Actions require approval by the Minister under the EPBC Act if they are likely to have a significant impact on a matter of national environmental significance. The EPBC Act provides for the listing of nationally threatened native species and ecological communities, native migratory species and marine species. The EPBC Act protects Australia's native species and ecological communities by providing for: identification and listing of species and ecological communities as
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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