Essential knowledge chapterssection s illustrative

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Essential knowledge Chapters/section s Illustrative examples covered 2.a.1 All living systems require constant input of free energy. 8.1 - 8.3 9.1 - 9.5 10.1, 10.2, 10.3 40.1 - 40.4 51.5 53.2, 53.4 55.2, 55.3 - Krebs cycle - Glycolysis - Electron Transport Chain - Fermentation -Light Reaction - Calvin cycle - Endothermy and Ectothermy - Seasonal reproduction in animals and plants - Life history strategy - Change in the producer level can affect the number and size of other trophic levels - change in energy resource levels such as sunlight can affect the number and size of the trophic levels 2.a.2 Organisms capture and store free energy for use in biological processes. 8 .3 9.1 – 9.5 10.1 – 10.3 - ATP - NADH in respiration - NADP in photosynthesis 2.a.3 Organisms must exchange matter with the environment to grow, reproduce and maintain organization. 3.1 – 3.3 4.1, 4.2 6.2 - Cohesion and Adhesion - High specific heat capacity - Universal solvent supports reactions - Heat of vaporization and Heat of fusion - Water’s thermal conductivity 2.b.1 Cell membranes are selectively permeable due to their structure. 7.1, 7.2 - Fluid mosaic model of membranes - Diffusion - Aquaporins - NA+/K+ pump 2.b.2 Growth and dynamic homeostasis are maintained by the constant movement of molecules across membranes. 7.3 – 7.5 - Simple diffusion - Glucose transport - NA+/K+ pump - H+ pump 2.b.3 Eukaryotic cells maintain internal membranes that partition the cell into specialized regions. 6.2 – 6.5 - Nuclear envelope - Endoplasmic reticulum - Mitochondria and Chloroplasts - Golgi bodies 2.c.1 Organisms use feedback mechanisms to maintain their internal environments and respond to external environmental changes. 18.1, 18.2 40.2 44.4 45.2 - Operons and Eukaryotic gene control mechanisms - Endothermy and Ectothermy - Kidney function - Glucose regulation - Calcium regulation 2.c.2 Organisms respond to changes in their external environments. 40.2 44.4 51.1 – 51.3 - Endothermy and Ectothermy - Kidney function - Animal behavior examples 2.d.1 All biological systems from cells and organisms to populations, communities, and ecosystems are affected by complex biotic and abiotic interactions including exchange of matter and free energy. 12.5 52.5 53.1 – 53.5 - Cell density - Temperature and water availability - Sunlight - Symbiosis (mutualism, commensalism, parasitism)
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54.1 – 54.5 55.1 – 55.4 - Predator-prey relationships - Water and nutrient availability, temperature, salinity, and pH - Availability of nesting sites - Food chains and food webs - species diversity - Population density 2.d.2 Homeostatic mechanisms reflect both common ancestry and divergence due to adaptation to different environments. 40.2, 40.3 44.2, 43.3 56.1 - Gas exchange in aquatic and terrestrial plants - Digestive mechanisms in animals - Respiration systems of aquatic and terrestrial animals - Nitrogenous was production and elimination in aquatic and terrestrial animals - Excretory systems across the animal Kingdom - Thermoregulation in animals (countercurrent exchange mechanisms) 2.d.3 Biological systems are affected by disruptions to their dynamic homeostasis.
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