Prayer christian prayer can be vocalized or silent

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Prayer Christian prayer can be vocalized or silent, public or private. All Christians have traditions of solitary prayer that are left to the individual’s moods and needs. Many Protestant denominations also create new communal prayers during every worship service. Ministers and congregants alike may offer up whatever prayers seem appropriate to the situation or occasion.
Church Worship Services More than some other religions, Christianity centers around public worship services that all church members are expected to attend regularly. In spite of a few key differences, Catholic and Protestant worship services can be quite similar. They are usually composed of a regular program of prayers, hymns, Old and New Testament readings, choral responses, a sermon, a collection of monetary offerings to the church, and the eucharist.
Church Life Worship is only one of the many functions fulfilled by most Christian churches. Churches frequently offer Bible study classes for children and adults, prayer groups, opportunities for congregants to socialize with one another, and fund-raising projects such as bake sales or craft fairs. Christian churches also often try to serve their communities with projects aimed at feeding or housing the poor, nursing the sick, or influencing public policy through political campaigns.
Christian Art Historically, the Christian church served as a key patron of and inspiration for the arts. Entire periods of European art history are characterized primarily by sacred art, from painted icons and stained glass to sculpture and architecture. Images of Jesus and Mary and basic symbols, such as the cross, formed a foundation for the Christian aesthetic language. Even before Christianity was adopted as the official religion of the Roman Empire, the Christian aesthetic came to incorporate numerous features, including saints, angels, and Bible stories.
The Liturgical Year The Christian holidays together form a pattern known in the Orthodox and Catholic churches (and in some Protestant churches as well) as “the liturgical year.” This is the calendar through which the Christian church annually recreates the drama of Jesus’s birth, death, and resurrection, as well as the new life Christians may experience through their faith in him.
Advent The liturgical year begins on the last Sunday in November with Advent. Advent consists of four weeks of preparation for Christmas. Many Christians keep an “Advent wreath” both at church and at home. On the first Sunday of Advent, a single candle is lit on the wreath. Then, one additional candle is lit each Sunday until, on the Sunday immediately before Christmas, four candles are burning.
Advent Advent means “the coming.” In theological terms, it celebrates the incarnation: God’s coming to earth in human form. Advent emphasizes God’s intention to be present in the world, and to share in the ordinary pains and sufferings of human beings. Advent is the counterbalance against tendencies in Christianity to regard God as infinitely superior to and distant from human beings.

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