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TINA_Advanced_Topics.pdf

Note that if you use a resistor as an input tina

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Note that if you use a resistor as an input, TINA calculates the transfer characteristic multiple times, once for each step of the resistance (parameter sweeping). When running an analysis on a nonlinear network, the DC analysis might not converge at certain points. These points will be skipped when plotting the response. If they are at the start and/or end values, the displayed (input) range will be truncated accordingly. Let’s look at two examples. First, let’s draw the characteristics of a bipolar transistor (CHARBIPO.TSC) Select the current source and Analysis/Mode to see how the base current, IB, is stepped. Then invoke the Analysis/DC Analysis/DC Transfer Characteristics command. See the following dialog: A + IC IB - + VC BC107A
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According to the dialog window, the input, VC, will be varied form the Start value (0V) to the End value (20) The result is familiar family of curves that constitute the common emitter characteristic of a transistor. Now let’s see an example of parameter sweeping (sweep.tsc) The circuit: The output is the power meter, showing the dissipation on Rload. + + W Pload R 10 Rload 1k - + 10
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If you invoke the Analysis/DC Analysis/DC Transfer Characteristics command, you’ll be greeted by this dialog box: Note that the resistor Rload is swept from 0 to 100 ohms. Press OK to obtain the following diagram: This is the well known curve of power dissipated on a load resistor as the load resistance is varied. Maximum power is transferred when the source resistance and load resistance are equal.
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Phasor diagram The phasor diagram is a great tool for demonstrating and studying circuit operation via complex phasors (vectors). Phasor diagrams can be used only with AC analysis with linear circuits, or with nonlinear circuits in working point linearization. Let’s use TINA to draw the phasor diagram of an RC circuit. First open the circuit RC.tsc in the examples\phasor directory. Run the AC Analysis.Phasor diagram command. TINA generates a new diagram containing three vectors in the diagram window . As you can see, Vgen is the vector sum of Rout and Cout, but to make this clearer you can change the position of the vectors. By default all the vectors originate from the origin of the coordinate system; however, you can translate them by simply clicking and dragging them into another place. When you drag a vector close to another vector’s starting or ending point, it will be automatically snapped to it. Try dragging the vector Rout to the end of Cout to form a triangle with Vgen. Notice that when you move the cursor above a vector, TINA presents its name, amplitude, and phase in the status-line.
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If you prefer a display without axes, turn the axes off using the View.Display axes menu. If you double click on a vector (or right-click it and select Properties), the vector’s configuration dialog box appears. In addition to the usual settings for the vector’s color, width, and style, you can also set the vector head style.
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