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Su1 8 sco107 the paradox of sustainable development

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SU1-8
SCO107The Paradox of Sustainable Developmentforests, a rotational system of annual cutting is applied such that harvests equaled growthincrement2to ensure sustained yield.In old-growth forests such as those found in the US, the operationalisation of sustainedyield by using a harvest-equals-growth principle does not work since the actual incrementwas low, and therefore cuttings will be limited3. Operationalisation of the sustained yieldprinciple now focuses on the silvi-cultural4condition of the growing stock instead ofbasing it solely on growing stock and rotation age. This means converting old-growthforests into more mature stands with higher production potential.The sustained yieldprinciple was subsequently operationalised as the provision of equal annual timbersupplies to the wood industry to ensure community sustainability(Wiersum 1995, 325).For tropical forests, this focus on community sustainability includes the demands oflocal communities for locally needed forest products, and not just timber commoditiesonly.It is clear that sustainable forest management has developed diverse norms andpractices, and internationally, there is no single acceptable system of guidelines forsustainable forest management. Timber certification is one attempt to allow consumersto select timber products that are produced sustainably, and other attempts were madeby organisations to develop guidelines for timer certification (Wiersum 1995, 325).Within each country and between countries, there are different norms and practices,resulting in different standards regarding the need to maintain forest ecosystems withmaintaining commercial production for economic development, or sustaining forest-2Increment growth:Incrementis the quantitativeincreasein size in a specified time interval duetogrowth.Understanding the relationship of tree size to age and increment to age helps to predictfuture growth.3The denser a forest is, the less growing space is made available to the tree, and the more competitionit face, resulting in slower growth. The density of a forest stand can be regulated by initial plantingspacing, thinning and other silvicultural practices.4Silviculture is the practice of controlling growth, composition/structure, and quality of forests to meetvalues and needs, specifically timber production. SeeSilviculture - Wikipedia.SU1-9
SCO107The Paradox of Sustainable Developmentdependent human institutions including protecting the cultural integrity of forest-dwelling tribes (Wiersum 1995, 325).1.2.3 Lessons learned from operationalising ‘sustainability’ in forestryWiersum concludes that from the 200 years of sustainability in forestry, we can learn afew lessons regarding the operational application of the concept of sustainability to forestmanagement (1995, 323-6):1.there is a need to recognise the different nature of ecological limits and socialdynamics,2.the role of dynamic social values with respect to forest resources, and3.the significance of operational experiences in trying to attain sustainabilitywithin a concrete context.

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Term
Fall
Professor
NoProfessor
Tags
Ecology, Natural environment

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