GNED 226 18 Lesson 3 The Home Computer Revolution Third party developers can

Gned 226 18 lesson 3 the home computer revolution

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GNED 226 18 Lesson 3: The Home Computer Revolution Third-party developers can create games for all systems Consoles are failing, so in order for publishers to survive, they will need a new platform… 1984
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THE HOME COMPUTER REVOLUTION The Other Console War
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GNED 226 20 1975 Lesson 3: The Home Computer Revolution Commodore, founded by Jack Tramiel in 1954, manufactures typewriters and calculators Cost of chips goes up in, becomes too expensive to produce calculators Rather than raising prices, Commodore decides to buy the chip manufacturer… MOS Technology commons.wikimedia.org
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GNED 226 21 1977 Lesson 3: The Home Computer Revolution Atari and Apple must now go through Commodore to get their chips Commodore decides to complete a project started by MOS: Personal Electronic Transactor 2001 ($795) Based on the MOS 6502 chip (used by the Apple II and Atari VCS) commons.wikimedia.org
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GNED 226 22 1979 Lesson 3: The Home Computer Revolution Atari releases two 8-bit “gaming” computer models 400 ($595) 800 ($999) Compatible with VCS joysticks Better sound, more colours than others commons.wikimedia.org commons.wikimedia.org
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GNED 226 23 1980 Lesson 3: The Home Computer Revolution Commodore releases the VIC-20 for $299 Underpowered, but VERY cheap 100s of games available Sold 2.5 million units over 5 years picclick.com
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GNED 226 24 1981 Lesson 3: The Home Computer Revolution IBM releases their “Personal Computer” ($1,565) Powerful, but too expensive for most users arstechnica.com
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GNED 226 25 1982 Lesson 3: The Home Computer Revolution Commodore releases the Commodore 64 for only $595 Cost less than $140 to manufacture Offered a $100 rebate if you brought a receipt for a competitor’s system
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GNED 226 26 Lesson 3: The Home Computer Revolution Best selling computer of all time: 17 million units over 12 years ~10,000 games written for this system over its lifetime MAJOR factor in the 1983 crash commons.wikimedia.org 1982
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  • Summer '20
  • Personal computer, MOS Technology 6502, home computer, Apple II series, Commodore 64

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