The book also enclosed a copy of a speech arguing for the freedom of Irish

The book also enclosed a copy of a speech arguing for

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convinced the master to release him from slavery. The book also enclosed a copy of a speech arguing for the freedom of Irish Catholics and for human rights largely. This book empowered Douglass to fully draft his case against slavery. In addition, it also led him to hate his masters more than ever. This predicament is hard for Douglass and often consumed him with regret. As Hugh Auld anticipated, Douglass’s dissatisfaction was painful for the injustice of his situation and all slaves. With no certain way to escape it, Douglass entered a dark place where he thought about suicide. During this timeframe, Douglass willingly observed anyone conversing about slavery. He repeatedly heard the word “abolitionist.”In a city newspaper version of a Northern abolitionist petition, Douglass finally learns that the word meant “antislavery.” This opened up a new mindset for Douglass on a mission to be freed. For the time being, Douglass started to learn how to write. After watching ship workers mark single letters on lumber, Douglass learned to mimic several letters. He practiced writing letters on fences, walls, and the ground anywhere he could. He would engage in a contest with local boys over who can write the best. Douglass used those opportunities to gain and learn as much as possible. Shortly, he was able to copy from the dictionary, and he also wrote in Thomas Auld’s old unwanted copybooks. After doing this many times, Douglass ultimately learned to write. While living in Baltimore, Douglass’s old master, Captain Anthony, dies. When Douglass is around the age of eleven years old, he was sent back to the plantation to be evaluated along with the other slaves and the livestock. All possessions were to be separated between Captain Anthony’s surviving children, Mrs. Lucretia Auld, and Andrew Anthony. Douglass was nervous about leaving Baltimore because he knew his life in the city was nicer than plantation life.
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