7 winfield scott 1786 1858 a a united states army

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7. Winfield Scott (1786-1858) a. A United States Army general, and unsuccessful presidential candidate of the Whig Party in 1852. b. Known as "Old Fuss and Feathers" and the "Grand Old Man of the Army," he served on active duty as a general longer than any other man in American history, and many historians rate him the best American commander of his time. c. In 1855 he received a brevet promotion to the rank of lieutenant general , becoming the first American since George Washington to hold that rank.
d. Scott's anti-slavery reputation undermined his support in the South, while the Party's pro-slavery platform depressed turnout in the North, and Scott's opponent was a Mexican–American War veteran as well. Pierce was elected in an overwhelming win, leaving Scott with the electoral votes of only Massachusetts , Vermont , Kentucky and Tennessee 8. Matthew C. Perry (1794-1858) 1850s a. Perry was a commodore of the United States Navy and commanded a number of ships. b. He served in several wars, most notably in the Mexican–American War and the War of 1812 . He played a leading role in the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854. c. Perry was very concerned with the education of naval officers and helped develop an apprentice system that helped establish the curriculum at the United States Naval Academy d. With the advent of the steam engine , he became a leading advocate of modernizing the US Navy and came to be considered The Father of the Steam Navy in the United States. 9. Kansas-Nebraska Act, 1854 a. Created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska by Democratic Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois b. The availability of tens of millions of acres of excellent farmland in the area made it necessary to create a territorial infrastructure to allow settlement. Railroad interests were especially eager to start operations since they needed farmers as customers. Four previous attempts to pass legislation had failed. The solution was a bill proposed in January 1854 by Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois. c. Since early in the 1840s the topic of a transcontinental railroad had been discussed. While there were debates over the specifics, especially the route to be taken, there was a public consensus that such a railroad should be built by private interests financed by public land grants. d. Several proposals in late 1852 and early 1853 had strong support, but in the end they failed because of disputes over whether the railroad would follow a northern or a southern route. e. The initial purpose of the Kansas–Nebraska Act was to open up many thousands of new farms and make feasible a Midwestern Transcontinental Railroad . The popular sovereignty clause of the law led pro- and anti-slavery elements to flood into Kansas with the goal of voting slavery up or down, resulting in Bleeding Kansas . 10. Ostend Manifesto, 1854 a. A document written in 1854 that described the rationale for the United States to purchase Cuba from Spain while implying that the U.S. should declare war if Spain refused. b. . . .

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