Lean Six Sigma QUAL50172 jan2016 Lean Six Sigma Building a Value Stream Map Im

Lean six sigma qual50172 jan2016 lean six sigma

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Lean Six Sigma QUAL50172-jan2016 Lean Six Sigma Building a Value Stream Map I’m going to have coffee Fill coffee maker with water Scoop coffee into coffee maker Get & place Filter in coffee maker Drink coffee Is taste OK Brew coffee Pour coffee into cup Add cream & sugar Water Supply Process Shopping Process Electricity Supply Process Eating Equipment Supply Process Tasting Process Housekeeping Processes Transactional & Support Processes Process Data & Information NVA = Non-value Added Time VA = Value Added Time VA Time NVA Time Temp of Water = ___ Quality of Water = ___ Pressure of Water = ___ Amount of Coffee = ___ Quality of Coffee = ___ Type of Coffee = ___ Defective Coffee = ___ 60 sec 30 sec 60 sec 360 sec 10 sec 60 sec 10 sec 10 sec 5 sec 600 sec 30 sec 8
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Lean Six Sigma QUAL50172-jan2016 Lean Six Sigma Process Philosophy Evolution Craft Mass Lean Characterization High Variety Standardized Variety Customized High volume Mod. - high volume Skilled work Fragmented/unskilled Multi-skilled work Advantages Output tailored to Low cost Flexibility, low cost, customer, high quality Low skill requirement high quality, speed Cautions Slow, high cost, high Rigid, low variety, No safety net, all skill requirement possibly volume at the elements must click, expense of quality and be synchronized 9
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Lean Six Sigma QUAL50172-jan2016 Lean Six Sigma Craft Highly skilled workers, custom making and fitting parts according to customers’ specific requirements, one product at a time Often, one person made the product using simple, flexible tools High levels of customer contact, hence very good quality 10 10
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Lean Six Sigma QUAL50172-jan2016 Lean Six Sigma Mass Production Henry Ford 1903:Model A 1908:Model T (user friendly, manufacturable) Breakthroughs in interchangeability of parts - standard gauging system simplicity of design – part reduction 1908: Typical assembler’s average task cycle: 514 min 8/1913: Just before “moving assembly line” Typical assembler’s average task cycle: 2.3min Need for adjusting and filing of parts eliminated; walking is WASTE The Moving Assembly Line at Highland Park Plant: Typical assembler’s average task cycle: 1.19min
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Lean Six Sigma QUAL50172-jan2016 Lean Six Sigma Lean Processes Toyoda Family – Toyota Motor Corp.- 1937 - Tiny Domestic Market and Variety Required - Workforce not willing to be treated as variable cost - Starved for capital and foreign exchange Late ‘40s: Americans imposed credit restrictions - Toyota in BIG slump - Fire a quarter of its workforce - Kiichiro Toyoda resigns - Remaining employees: Lifetime employment 12 12
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Lean Six Sigma QUAL50172-jan2016 Lean Six Sigma Lean Processes OHNO’s experiments with stamping: - Small capital budget – few stamping machines - Change dies frequently 1 day to few minutes Eliminate die-change specialists - Discovery-Cost less per part to make SMALL batches than to run BIG batches - OHNO needed skilled, highly motivated workforce 13 13
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Lean Six Sigma QUAL50172-jan2016 Lean Six Sigma What are the 5 S’s ? A system for organizing your workplace Seiri Seiton Seison Seiketsu Shitsuke ( ) Sort/Separate Straighten/Sequence Shine/Sweep Standardize Sustain Separate the necessary from the unnecessary: I know what I need
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