Refers to the consistency of a set of measurements when a testing procedure is

Refers to the consistency of a set of measurements

This preview shows page 9 - 12 out of 17 pages.

Refers to the consistency of a set of measurements when a testing procedure is  repeated on a population of individuals or groups o Random or unsystematic errors: occurrence or degree of the error does not appear  to be predictable o Systematic errors: the errors may be made in a consistent, or predictable fashion
Image of page 9
o Systematic errors  do not affect the accuracy of the measurements but rather the  meaning or interpretation of those measurements Interpreting reliability coefficients o Another way to think of reliability is in terms of the variability of a set of scores o Reliability can be thought of as the ratio of true score variance, Var(T), to  observed score variance, Var(X) o o  is the reliability coefficient, the degree that observed sores, which are made on  the same stable characteristic, correlate with one another Measurement error o Measurement error can be thought of as the hypothetical difference between an  individual’s observed score on any particular measurement and the individual’s  true score o Measurement error, whether systematic or random, reduces the usefulness of any  set of measures or the results from any test o It reduces the confidence that we can place in the score the measure assigns to any particular individual o The  standard error of measurements  is a statistical index that summarizes  information related to measurement error o This index is estimated from observed scores obtained over a group of individuals o It reflects how an individual’s score would vary, on average, over repeated  observations that were made under identical conditions Factors affecting reliability The factors that introduce error into any set of measurements can be organized into three  broad categories. o Temporary individual characteristics o Factors such as health, motivation, fatigue, and emotional state introduce  temporary, unsystematic errors into the measurement process o Lack of standardization o Changing the conditions under which measurements are made introduces  error into the measurement process o Can be random or systematic o Chance o Factors unique to a specific procedure introduce error into the set of  measurements o Change factors produce unsystematic or random measurement errors
Image of page 10
Methods of estimating reliability o To measure reliability, we have to estimate the degree of variability in a set of  scores that is caused by measurement error o We can obtain this estimate by using two different, but parallel, measures of the  characteristic or attribute o Over the same set of people, both measures should report the same score for each  individual o This score will represent the true score plus measurement error o Both measures reflect the same true score; discrepancies between the two sets of  scores suggest the presence of measurement error o The correlation coefficient based on the scores from both measures gives an  estimate of r xx , the reliability coefficient o
Image of page 11
Image of page 12

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 17 pages?

  • Fall '14
  • SarahJaneRoss
  • Psychology, researcher, investigator, measurement error, o Science

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture