Drinking and his results wouldnt have been flagged as

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drinking, and his results wouldn’t have been flagged as a violation by state-run laboratory that uses a higher cutoff point to avoid picking up incidental exposures. Turns out, DeFrise’s job required him to be exposed to alcohol-based cleaning products, and he used alcohol-based hygiene products, which most likely caused the test to come back positive. The court did find DeFrise guilty of violating the terms of his probation. The judge told DeFrise if he violated his probation again, he would go to jail. On the day of his hearing. DeFrise tested positive for alcohol and marijuana. DeFrise’s father immediately drove him to a private lab to retake the test, and it came back negative, showing again incidental exposure taken place in state-ran lavatories, but that didn’t change the courts decision. DeFrise’s conviction went on his record, sentenced him to 60 days in jail, and a $500 fine, which was suspended with a new two-year probation sentence. DeFrise only served 4 days in jail, and was ordered to wear a 24/7 alcohol monitoring device. DeFrise’s probation officer placed him in an intensive drug testing program, which costed him a lot more fees to pay. DeFrise and his family paid thousands and thousands of dollars in probation fees, which impacted his family. Him being on probation, and being accidently tested positive for alcohol and marijuana, when in fact he has not been using, impacted his life and job negatively.
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I found another article showing a little bit about how life can be sometimes after parole. A lot of times life can be a complete struggle after parole, because of not being able to find a job, or family turning their back against the parolee, or just the struggle to adapt to life outside of prison. But sometimes, parolees adapt just fine. Darnell Epps, and his brother Darryl, went to confront a gang member on March 8, 2000, after Darryl’s wife had been sexually assaulted. Within seconds of the confrontation, Darryl fired shots in a struggle for the gun, wounding the gang member and himself. Later, the gang member died. Months later, Darryl and Darnell were on the verge of spending 40 to life in prison without parole, but Justice Gustin L. Reichbach sentenced each of them to serve 17 ½ years to life, with a possibility of parole. Both were taken to Five Points
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  • Fall '13
  • juvenile court

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