Of the background ecological information and initial

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of the background ecological information and initial recommendations for fauna outlined in the KIBMP have come from Donaghey (2003). King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 69
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Conservation of Tasmanian Plant Species and Communities Threatened by Phytophthora cinnamomi – Strategic Regional Plan for Tasmania The report addresses management of Phytophthora cinnamomi in Tasmania through the establishment of priority management areas (Schahinger et al . 2003). Plant communities were rated for their known susceptibility to infection. The report outlines the process required to meet two objectives of the national Threat Abatement Plan for Dieback caused by the Root-rot fungus Phytophthora cinnamomi (Environment Australia 2001): To promote the recovery of nationally listed threatened species and ecological communities that are known or perceived to be threatened by P. cinnamomi; and To limit the spread of P. cinnamomi into areas where it may threaten threatened species and ecological communities or into areas where it may lead to further species or ecological communities becoming threatened For a more detailed description of actions refer to the report (Schahinger et al . 2003). The Tasmanian State Government has also developed interim management and wash down guidelines for the control of Phytophthora cinnamomi (DPIWE 2004; Rudman 2005), and these are recommended in the KIBMP. Threat Abatement Plan for Feral Cats This plan (DEWHA 2008) discusses the threats posed by feral cats to native wildlife and objectives for their management across Australia. Key objectives of the feral cat abatement plan that relate to King Island are: Eradicate feral cats from islands where they are a threat to endangered or vulnerable native animals; Promote the recovery of species and ecological communities that are endangered or vulnerable as a result of predation by feral cats; Improve knowledge and understanding of the impacts of feral cats on endangered or vulnerable native animals and the interactions of feral cats with other pest species (e.g. rabbits, rats); Communicate the results of the threat abatement plan actions to management agencies, landholders and the public; Effectively coordinate feral cat control activities. King Island Revegetation – Best Practice Notes This management guide focuses on practical methods of revegetation of native vegetation, specific to King Island. Methods are recommended based on local knowledge, field assessments and professional advice. It outlines the economic and biodiversity values of managing existing native vegetation and methods for revegetation of cleared areas (Duddles 2002). The methods used are recommended in the KIBMP. Draft Report on the Conservation and Management of Rivers and Streams of King Island This report considers the geomorphic nature, condition and value of stream systems on King Island. It considers the natural values of drainage systems, classification of streams based on five landscape types and how to prioritise conservation of catchments to get the best possible result from conservation King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 70
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work. The report highlights the importance of maintaining and improving the
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