Questions to ask the family would lead me to a diagnosis and plan of care For

Questions to ask the family would lead me to a

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 8 pages.

Questions to ask the family would lead me to a diagnosis and plan of care. For example, who prepares the meals for the family? What types of food do you prefer? Using tools such as the 24- hour diet recall, questioning portion size, additives such as salt and sugar, and how many meals a day are eaten will help determine nutrition for the child (Ball, Dains, Flynn, Solomon, & Stewart, 2018). Asking questions about family history is helpful in assessing risk. For example, a family history of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes are prevalent in the African American population (Hastings, 2019). Knowing if there is a family history of these diseases is essential to health promotion and disease prevention. Family history can be a predicting factor for future disease and preventive measures, such as diagnostic testing. For example, a family history of diabetes would warrant screening for hemoglobin A1C in certain circumstances. Prevention can be dietary modifications. Diagnostic Testing and Physical Exam To assess the patient’s growth and nutritional status, I would first obtain weight and height. I would also identify body mass index (BMI) for the patient. The BMI will give information on obesity and nutritional status (Ball et al., 2018). “BMI provides a reliable indicator of body fatness for most people and is used to screen for weight categories that may lead to health problems” (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019). The growth chart will provide information on the growth, development, and overall health of the child (Ball et al., 2018). Growth charts can be found online through websites such as the centers for disease control and
Image of page 3
prevention (CDC) and the world health organization (WHO) and in textbooks for easy use. The CDC and WHO, are creditable and reliably source for health information for practitioners to use. The CDC recommends using BMI to determine if a child is obese or overweight; for example, a BMI above 95 th percentile is considered overweight (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019). Expert committees and the CDC recommend the tables to measure growth and development; this shows the validity and reliability of the assessment tools. Nurse practitioners use BMI measurements and growth charts as part of the physical exam to determine a diagnosis, plan of care, education, and recommendations for the patient and their family. To treat the five year old in the scenario, the nurse practitioner must utilize assessment tools to make a proper diagnosis and plan of care.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 8 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture