Animals were also a key part of the columbian

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Animals were also a key part of the Columbian Exchange. Horses, pigs, sheep, and cattle were all European animals that flourished rapidly in the Americas because they were able to reproduce without being hindered by predators. Pigs were also a key animal used during ocean travels because they could be dumped on the way to a
country or place and then picked up and eaten on the way back. The horse, too, was also a very useful animal as it helped with battle; it allowed for faster travel, it allowed for the surprising of opponents, and allowed people to fight from a higher level. “Columbian Exchange” March 31, 2006 Lauren Rees Document 4 Indigenous People's Day changes the public perception of Columbus as a hero who discovered America. Columbus was in the right place at the right time. He discovered America by accident and the country was already inhabited. His actions should not be glorified. Columbus may not have personally raped and pillaged (rob by force) millions of Native Americans, but his actions opened a floodgate to the near destruction of an entire people. Columbus' arrival marks a part of the beginning of America, but it is not necessarily a beginning that should be celebrated with a federal holiday. Columbus's actions should not be considered as destructive as those of war criminals. The Native American genocide that occurred after Columbus's arrival has not been shown in textbooks as a part of his intention. Staff editorial The State News (Michigan State U.) 2000 Document 5: Farming and Food calories North America Europe Chief Crops Calories per Hectare Maize 7.3 Potato 7.5 Yams (Sweet Potato) 7.1 Cassava 9.9 Chief Crops Calories per Hectare Rice 7.3 Wheat 4.2 Barley 5.1 Oats 5.5 www2.kenyon.edu/Depts/Psci/Inst21/columbian_exchange.htm Document 6
Columbus, basing his calculations on incorrect assumptions about the size of the earth, assumed that it would be possible to reach the rich markets of eastern Asia by sailing west. Had he succeeded in finding a new trade route, it would have made him a very wealthy man. Instead he found the Caribbean, then inhabited by cultures with little in the way of gold, silver or trade goods. Unwilling to completely abandon his calculations, Columbus made a laughingstock of himself back in Europe by claiming that the Earth was not round, but shaped like a pear. He had not found Asia, he said, because of the bulging part of the pear near the stalk. This one is partially true. The Europeans, with ships, guns, fancy clothes and shiny trinkets, made quite an impression on the tribes of the Caribbean, whose technology was far behind that of Europe. Columbus made a good impression when he wanted to: for example, he made friends with a local chieftain on the Island of Hispaniola named Guacanagari because he needed to leave some of his men behind .

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