Shows how those at the bottom of the social hierarchy

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shows how those at the bottom of the social hierarchy are eventually the ones who enter into the Kingdom of God. In Matthew’s narrative Joseph is the parent that is focused upon. Jesus is seen as the legal son of Joseph, but a child of the Holy Spirit. He was born in a house and during the rule of Herod the Great. In Luke’s Gospel, Mary is emphasized and is greeted by an angel who tells her that she is to conceive a son and name it Jesus, which signifies him as highly honorific. In his gospel, he is not born into a house, but instead a stable at an inn ten years after Herod’s rein. Additional characters are addressed in both Gospels, to help the authors depict the coming of Jesus in a divine light. In Luke’s gospel, he describes encounters with Anna, Simeon, Elizabeth, Zechariah, and the shepherds. These figures become models of Jewish
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Bordeaux 4 piety, by showing their devotion and morality towards Jesus. In the gospel of Matthew, the main characters emphasized are the Magi from the east, King David, and King Herod. Historical observations that come along with the traveling Magi are that they are known to be following a star to Jerusalem in search for the King of the Jews. This shows that people acknowledged him as their King even before he was actually born. Matthew wrote that Jesus was born in Bethlehem, which was also the birthplace of King David, connecting him to a king in yet another way. King Herod was the only main character that was fearful of the coming of Jesus. He was at the top of the social ladder and saw Jesus as a threat, for he too expected Jesus to be the Messiah. The wise men, those who would have usually obeyed Herod’s orders, kept the birth of Jesus a secret after being warned by a dream. The birth of Jesus gave them the courage to stand up to those superior. Together, the infancy narratives create an overall theme. Both Matthew and Luke wanted to show the reader how beneficial the birth of Jesus was in foreshadowing the rest of his ministry. Birth corresponds to the question of identity. Jesus, however, never seemed to have a question regarding his identity at birth. From the very beginning he was called to bring people closer to God and to his Kingdom. Both gospels work towards presenting the outsider theme by using their encounters with Jesus himself. The outsiders may be looked down upon by the wealthy, but they are seen to be the only ones that know and preach the coming of Jesus even before his birth.
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