Stigma can be a significant barrier for those who are infected or suspect they

Stigma can be a significant barrier for those who are

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and their perceptions that influence risky behavior (Kanekar, 2011). Stigma can be a significant barrier for those who are infected or suspect they are infected, preventing or delaying them from seeking care. Stigma is often underestimated by healthcare workers. A study by Pulerwitz, Michaelis, Weiss, Brown, & Mahendra, (2010) in three public hospitals found that healthcare workers do not recognize stigma as a barrier. Four critical dimensions of stigma were articulated and tested: Inappropriate fear of contagion: Measures focus on attitudes that reflect fear of infection and HIV transmission from casual contact with people living with HIV. Negative judgments about people living with HIV: Measures focus on beliefs that reflect blame, shame, and casting moral judgments on HIV-infected people. Enacted stigma or discrimination: Measures encompass both interpersonal forms of discrimination (e.g., isolating or teasing people living with HIV) and institutional forms of discrimination (e.g., being fired from work or denied health care because of HIV). Compounded stigma: Measures focus on perceptions of the association between HIV and specific (usually marginalized) groups, such as sex workers The impact of HIV can be moderated when healthcare workers work to reduce HIV associated stigma. Patient Compliance Continuing patient education with recurring reinforcement of information is vital to help the patient remain compliant with treatment. “Taking HIV medicines every day prevents HIV from multiplying, which reduces the risk that HIV will mutate and produce drug-resistant HIV.
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  • Spring '17
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