Coefficients of friction which will result in some

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3/25/21 REPORT Nathan Huddleston PHYS 1401.030 The static frictional coefficent tends to be bigger than the kinetic friction coefficient. This is because there are more forces at work to keep the box still than there is to move the box. Table one in part A matches up with this theory, but table 2 does not. I think this is because when I used the website to get data, I might have had the heavier weight on instead of the lighter one.
They did vary with normal force. The kinetic and static friction depend on what variables the surface they are on/ made up of such as wood, felt, or aluminum.
coefficients of friction, which will result in some natural % difference. What sources of error in the simulations for Part A only do you introduce, and how might they affect your results? Write out your answer in a clear and well supported paragraph.
Experiment 7: Static & Kinetic Friction Student Name: Section Number: A. Determination of μ k and μ s (equilibrium) Table 1: Wood on Aluminum m b = m w = μ s q k μ k m b .209/ 12.9 deg .229/ m b + m w .189/ 11.1 deg .196/ /10.1 %/ % diff = /15.5 %/ Table 2: Felt on Aluminum m b = m w = μ s q k μ k m b .259/ 14.1 deg .251/ m b + m w .268/ 15.4 deg 0.275/ /3.42%/ % diff = /9.13%/ B. Determination of μ k (accelerated motion) Table 3: Wood on Aluminum m b = m w = a μ k m b 0.490/ .250/ % diff m b + m w .497/ .253/ 1.10%/ Table 4: Felt on Aluminum m b = m w = a μ k m b 0.493 0.290/ % diff m b + m w 0.491 0.292/ .700%/ % diff = 3/25/21 DATA Nathan Huddleston PHYS 1401.030 q s 10.7 deg 120. g 120. g 120. g 120. g 120. g 11.8 deg q s 15.0 deg % diff = 14.5 deg 120. g 120. g 120. g m h 86.5 g 43.0 g m h 38.0 g 77.0 g

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