Early Commercial Networks Interregional Trade Ethnic groups linked into

Early commercial networks interregional trade ethnic

This preview shows page 10 - 12 out of 16 pages.

Early Commercial Networks Interregional Trade Ethnic groups linked into regional networks by inland waterways Trade facilitated by great West African rivers - the Niger, the Gambia, the Benue, and the Volta- and interlacing lakes, lagoons, and streams Merchants used slaves and draft animals to carry cargo along overland trade routes Internal Slave Trade Many slaves came from the decentralized interior African Slavery Used to help facilitate trade Most of the slaves came from stateless societies ( African slavery was an intrical part African slavery is very similar to islamic/arabian slave system Slaves were allowed to marry (into families), have families, have jobs, own land Economy was not tied to slaves Slave Women were more highly priced than men Often returned to their own people Children were not allowed to be sold into slavery Research has shown that as early as 1086 slaves of European decent represented 10% of the english population (Slavic Eastern Europe) 1453 Constantinople fell helping move slavery from Europe to Africa Basil Davidson asserts that prior to the 1500 “slave trade business in Africa took place along the coast of West Africa” Objectives of Lecture Discuss the similarities and differences between slavery as institutions in Latin America, Slavery in Caribbean and in Colonial British America Identify types of slaves in Caribbean and LAtin America Identify the major features of slavery in the Spanish, British and America Know these terms Absentee Landlordism Overseer Maroons Asiento Urban Slaves Free-Lancers slaves Manumission or Cartas Indentured Servitude Factors
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Africans were heavily involved in the task of opening up the New World Maroons Communities: Trelawney Town, St. Mary’s Parish Tacky’s Rebellion French Code Noir Seasoned Slaves Creole Caboceer Salt Water Origin of slavery in the new World, in Latin America and in Caribbean Islands Africans were not the “majority of all the world’s slaves” until the early 17th century European traffic in African slaves was the product of the Establishment of states Rise in national government Commercial revolution Renaissance Era Europeans control of slave trade Newly established states sought power and influence in the New World and in Africa The spirit of Renaissance, the practice of the Commercial Revolution and new techniques of exploitation helped the Europeans to acquire wealth and power. Spain and Portugal were the first of the two new nation states of western- Europe to stake claims on the New World Finding New Lands and Labor By the late 17th century, New World land owners began to favor black slaves Slaved could be purchased, helped to stabilized labor force Slaves were easily apprehended because of their skin color Slave Trade
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