They knew the most significant way to make a statement was to show Britain that

They knew the most significant way to make a

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Parliament as they were not consulted or had any elected members. They knew the most significant way to make a statement was to show Britain that they were dependent, and they did so by boycotting British goods. After instances such as the Boston Tea Party and Boston Massacre, and the creation of the Intolerable Acts, many prominent men spoke out against the British’s control over the colonists which helped to further the Americans belief that something must be done. Both the British and the Colonists took steps to protect their assets from each other which eventually led to the Revolution. The Declaration of Independence The words of Thomas Paine, as stated in Common Sense , said that it only made sense for America to break away from the corrupt island country that was trying to rule the world. These words sparked a desire for Independence in America. Not long after, in 1776, some of the most prominent men would come together to draft what would become the Declaration of Independence. Recognizable historical figures Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and Benjamin Franklin, among others, wrote of the many reasons why the colonies were breaking away from the Crown of Great Britain using John Locke’s Theory of Government as a model of what a government should be, and how the British Monarchy was not that. Some of the grievances
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UNITING THE NATION: ECONOMIC GROWTH 9 stated include imposing taxes without consent, cutting off trade with the rest of the world, not attending to the colonist’s rights, constant presence of the British army, waging war against the colonies and essentially accusing King George III of being a Tyrant. In this famous document it was stated that it was their right to govern themselves, that “all men are created equal” and went on to declare that the colonies from then on would be independent and free. Conclusion After a long period of self-government and independence, the colonies did not appreciate the new control that was exhibited over them. Though England felt it fair for the Americans to have to repay the debts accumulated from the war, the fact that they imposed these new taxes without their consent led them to feel as though their rights were being taken away. It was only natural for them to resist this control and revolt. They did so by boycotting British goods, and claiming their independence from Britain. If the Crown would have handled things differently and decided to include the colonies in Parliament by electing representatives and giving them more of a voice, things may have ended very differently, but instead they chose to tighten control which led to resentment and eventually revolt. .
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UNITING THE NATION: ECONOMIC GROWTH 10 References Brooks, R. (2017). The 13 Colonies in the Revolutionary War - History of Massachusetts. Retrieved from . Tindall, G., & Shi, D. (2016). America: A Narrative History (10th ed.). New York: W.W. Norton and Company.
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