Cases a leader may quickly interpret a problem to be

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cases, a leader may quickly interpret a problem to be familiar with a previous one hence a quick a decision is made to avert time wasting. Such actions become problematic because the situation has been made worse by the giving the wrong solution hence critical thinking is vital. According to Kallet (2014), decisions and conclusions are not the same as considered by many individuals when it comes to problem-solving or decision-making. In regard, the thinking process for conclusions and decisions is very different. Kallet (2014) gives an example “you probably have a to-do list of your tasks. You haven’t decided to do them yet, because if you did, they would not be on your to-do list; they would be on your done list. Although you might be the one who is responsible for coming up with a solution or a conclusion, you might not be the decision maker; it might be your boss”. The author shows that when coming up to a conclusion, one does not necessarily care about the outcome unlike making a decision. Making a decision
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DECISION MAKING 4 requires one to fully acknowledge the possible outcomes which could occur and how it might affect other people concerned. It is important to understand the role a person plays in decision making. Kallet (2014) describes two types of individuals who are “recommender” and “decision-maker”. A “recommender” is a person who recommends the best solution to a problem and the “decision- maker” implements the solution. Understanding one’s role gives an individual the necessary tools to handle the problem. Moreover, being the “decision-maker” enables you to know “when the decision needs to be made, as well as the need behind the decision” (Kallet, 2014). Shortcomings are bound to occur when the decision made does not offer a viable solution. Kallet (2014) postulates that risks are part of any decision-making process and therefore we must critically think and weigh the best solution with fewer risks. In most cases, people compare the downside and the upside of making the decision. If the downside overwhelms the benefits of the upside, it’s best to get another alternative. On the other hand, if the upside offers more benefits that would make the downside risks not worth contemplating, it’s best to implement the solution. There are times leaders do not have a full glimpse of the risk involved when making a decision. Moreover, when the decision has been executed, and the downside occurs unexpectedly, the leader must either reverse the decision to avoid further damages or at times suffer the consequences of the outcome. Mitigation plays a critical role after the downside occurs and thus it mainly involves planning on reducing the effects of the outcome. At times, people find it difficult to make decisions and hence to look back at the processes involved helps to get to a conclusion. Kallet (2014) gives an example by indicating
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DECISION MAKING 5 that decisions are not “Should I buy the blue one or the red one?” They are “I’ve concluded to buy the red one; should I now buy it or not?”. If an individual finds himself in such situation, it probably means going back to the drawing board is the best alternative which is analyzing the conclusion of the situation. In some scenarios, leaders find themselves second-guessing the
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