Draw conclusions Report to management present findings conclusions that will be

Draw conclusions report to management present

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Draw conclusions Report to management: present findings & conclusions that will be most helpful to decision making Different data types, samples Observational Gathers data by observing relevant people, actions, situations Impossible to observe feelings Ethnographic yields deeper observation Survey
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Gathers data by asking people questions Most used method for secondary data Suited for gathering descriptive information Experimental Matches group of people, looks for differences in responses Best suited for explaining cause-and-effect relationships Probability Sample Simple random sample: every member of the population has a known & equal chance of selection Stratified random sample: the population is divided into mutually exclusive groups, & random samples are drawn from each group Cluster (area) sample: the population is divided into mutually exclusive groups (such as blocks), and the researcher draws a sample of the groups to interview Nonprobability Sample Convenience sample: the researcher selects the easiest population members from whom to obtain information Judgement sample: the researcher uses his or her judgement to select population members who are good prospects for accurate information Quota sample: the researcher finds & interviews a prescribed number of people in each of several categories Different data gathering, contact methods: pros and cons Research approaches Observation Survey - Pros: interactive & engaging, easier to complete, higher response rates, low cost - Cons: no internet Experiment Contact Methods: Mail - Pros: collects large amounts of information at low cost & may give more honest answers to more personal questions - Cons: usually take longer to complete, & response rate is low & researcher has little control over the questions and which address fills out the questionnaire Telephone - Pros: explain difficult questions & be able to skip questions, response rates usually higher & interviewers can speak to respondent with desired characteristics or by name - Cons: don’t want to discuss personal questions with interviewer, interviewer can be bias, people tend to hang up Personal Online 1. Individual interviewing - Pros: flexible, guide interviews, explain difficult questions & explore issues as situation requires - Cons: expensive 2. Group interviewing
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- Pros: free & easy discussion; hoping group interactions will bring out actual feelings & thoughts - Cons: participants are paid a small sum for attending Focus group interviewing 1. Inviting 6-10 people to meet with a trained moderator to talk about product, service or organization - Pros: Free & easy discussion; hoping group interactions will bring out actual feelings & thoughts - Cons: participants are paid a small sum for attending Sampling Plan Sampling unit Sample size Sampling procedure Research Instruments Questionnaire 1. Questions to ask 2. Style of questions; open-ended & or closed-ended 3. Wording & ordering of questions - Pros: flexible, low cost - Cons: depending on the question and how you ask sometimes you might
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