And performance a process i repeat over and over

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and performance, a process I repeat over and over throughoutthe development cycle.As the number of web-accessing devices has grown, browsertesting has become a nuanced activity, requiring developers tomake subjective decisions about minor variations in the experi-ence that individual devices receive. When pulling up a site on aFIG 2.23:Friends gathered around a collection of test devices and laptops. Photograph byLuke Wroblewski ().
SUSTAINABLE DETECTION87particular device, I like to ask myself a series of questions aboutthe site’s design and functionality:Does the site load and present itself in a reasonable amountof time?Is the core content and functionality usable and accessible?Does the level of enhancement in the layout feel appropriateto the device?• Is the text easy to scan? Do the line lengths promotereadability?• Is the site controllable and browsable via common inputmechanisms on the device (touch, mouse, keyboard, etc.)?Are the actionable areas of the page easy to tap without tap-ping on adjacent items?Does the layout hold up to changes in orientation, viewportresizing, and font size?FIG 2.24:The Browserstack testing service.
88RESPONSIBLE RESPONSIVE DESIGN• If the device has assistive technology installed (such asVoiceOver), does the content read back in meaningful ways?Does the page scroll efficiently? Do animations run smoothly?The more devices we can test, the better our chances ofreaching our users wherever they are.NEXT UPIn this chapter, we covered many of the complexities of writingsustainable, cross-browser code. With that, we can proceed toour fourth tenet of responsible responsive design: performance.Because performance is a heavy topic—perhaps the one mostin need of our attention when building responsive websitestoday—I’ve dedicated two chapters to its discussion.Let’s move ahead—with speed.
PLANNING FOR PERFORMANCE89I want you to ask yourself when you make things, when youprototype interactions, am I thinking about my own clock, orthe user’s?”—paul ForD,“10 Timeframes,” WE’RE NOT DOING A GOOD JOBPage-load times in the ten-second range are still common onmodern mobile networks, and that’s a fraction of how long ittakes in countries with older, more limited networks. Why soslow? It’s mostly our fault: our sites are too heavy, and they’re of-ten assembled and delivered in ways that don’t take advantage ofhow browsers work. According to HTTP Archive (.com/rrd/3-02/), the average website weighs 1.7 megabytes. (It’sprobably heftier now, so you may want to look it up.) To makematters worse, most of the sites surveyed on HTTP Archivearen’t even responsive, but focus on one specific use case: theclassic desktop computer with a large screen.

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Term
Spring
Professor
Faisal Yaseen
Tags
Web Design, The Land, L E R E S

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