We have no selfish ends to serve we desire no

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We have no selfish ends to serve. We desire no conquest, no dominion. We seek no indemnities for ourselves, no material compensation for the sacrifices we shall freely make. We are but one of the champions of the rights of mankind (14). Wilson makes his mission statement to protect the world from tyranny and to spread the principles of democracy, thus acquiring the role as the Savior of democracy. More importantly, Wilson affirms that America is not entering the war for personal gain, but is entering to protect mankind. World War I showed how America first took on the role of the Savior of democracy with no hidden motives or self-interests, but would this change with the culmination of World War II? With the outbreak of World War II in 1939, America was once again called to save the world from domination. Hitler had already marched through Poland, France, and
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Belgium while England was barely holding her ground against German bombings— democracy in Europe was in danger. America first took only a small part as the Savior, for foreign policy dictated that only ammunition and supplies would be sent, no troops. In his annual address to congress, Franklin Roosevelt suggests that America should not send men, but weapons of defense. He asserts, “They do not need man power, but they do need billions of dollars worth of the weapons of defense” (FDR, 668). Thus, America did not take full responsibility as the Savior, for the president did not want to send any troops, only supplies. This self-protection and lack of full effort shows how America would not enter World War II unless her own territory was in immediate danger. Moreover, Henry Luce, the author of The American Century , declares that America has a duty to serve and that America must uphold the role of the Savior. Luce understands that America does not want to be involved in the war, for he proscribes “If there’s one place we Americans did not want to be; it was in the war. We didn’t want much to be in any kind of war but, if there was one kind of war we most of all didn’t want to be in, it was a European war” (Luce, 2). He also criticizes America for not fully taking leadership and responsibility in the world, for he writes, “America has refused to rise to the opportunities of leadership in the world” (Luce, 5). Thus, Luce advocates American involvement in World War II because he believes America must respond, take action, and be the Savior for democracy. Luce’s declaration for American involvement begs the question: why must America assume the role as the Savior? Luce gives a powerful answer to this question, for he commands, “we must accept whole heartedly our duty and our opportunity as the most powerful and vital nation in the world and in consequence to exert upon the world
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the full impact of our influence, for such purposes we see fit and by such means we see fit” (Luce, 7). This bold statement explains, according to Luce, why America should take on the role as the Savior—America is the most powerful country in the world, so America should act like it.
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